Welcome!

 

 

SEE ASSIGNMENT LINK with dropboxes AT MID-LEFT OF eCOLLEGE SCREEN.

 

Course syllabus http://www.park.edu/syllabus/list.aspx

 

Course planning page has everything in eCollege in one place so you can use your computer or browser "Find" function (control F) if needed. This will also allow you to work ahead, click here.

 

Dr. J. Aitken, Professor, Communication Arts
229 Copley, 8700 NW River Park Drive, Park University, Parkville, MO 64152 816-584-6785 (message/office). Email me, and I'll send your my home and cell phone number. Please telephone me with your questions.

 

The beautiful, engaging, and thought-provoking art gracing this course is available for purchase from AllPosters.Com. They hold the copyright to the pictures.  I also enjoy animal pictures, which are sent to me from students (source unknown).  If any are copyrighted and should be taken down, please contact me, and I will do so.

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Tentative Schedule

Weekly Objectives

Text Chap. Reading

Teaching Content Reading

Discussion Due

Major Assignment Due Each Week

Week 1 Overview

Adapt to Adult Learners through Active Learning and Collaborative Learning.

Analyze and Use Course Management Strategies, Including E-Course Environments, Student Behavioral Expectations, Using Syllabi Systems, and Discussion.

Ch. 1-3

Begin reading the text for Public Speaking, Interpersonal, Public Relations, or Kouzes & Posner. See the appropriate workshop link at lower left.

 

http://vortis.com/blog/archives/2005/may/Prepare.jpg

Photo credit

Week 2 Plan

Analyze Instructional Best Practices In Teaching Public Speaking, Interpersonal Communication, and Leadership Communication.

Conduct a Needs Assessment and Task Analysis.

Develop Objectives and Designing Curriculum.

4-5

Complete the reading the text for Public Speaking, Interpersonal, Public Relations, or Kouzes & Posner.

Discussion Board for weeks 1 & 2

PROJECT ITEM DUE: Bibliography and task analysis of content for instructional unit, which will be part of the core assessment project for this course  (due by Sunday, Wk 2 in Assignment link dropbox)

 

ONE CONTENT AREA EXAM DUE (do the content area you will teach in your core assessment)

Week 3 Train

Develop Training Content.

Use Training Methods.

6-7

Discuss the text content for Public Speaking, Interpersonal, Public Relations, or Kouzes & Posner.

Discussion Board 3

PROJECT ITEM DUE: Needs Analysis of the individuals you will teach/train, including pretest or needs assessment measure and results (Wk 3 in Assignment link dropbox) 

Week 4 Present

Use Technology and Presentation Aids in Training.

Develop Training Plans.

8-9

Discuss the text content for Public Speaking, Interpersonal, Public Relations, or Kouzes & Posner.

Discussion Board 4

PROJECT ITEM DUE: (a)Behavioral objectives (b) Learning activities designed to engage students/trainees, instructional materials, handouts, learning games, visual aids, PowerPoint, and other supporting materials.  Include the Participant’s Guide/Workbook containing all training handouts and materials for your unit.  (c) Test/assessment measure of objectives (Wk 4 in Assignment link dropbox).

EXAM DUE: Content area exam you selected must be complete by Sunday.

Week 5 Assess

Deliver the Training Session.

Manage Conflict in the Training Classroom.

10-11

Discuss the text content Public Speaking, Interpersonal, Public Relations, or Kouzes & Posner.

Discussion Board 5

No major assignment due.

Week 6 Teach

Assess Learning Outcomes.

Evaluate trends and Career Opportunities in Training and Development.

No new reading

Are you smiling yet?

No required discussion board.

PROJECT DUE by Sunday. 

Put all weekly materials together with your latest work into ONE FILE YOU SUBMIT AS THE CORE ASSESSMENT PROJECT.

(Wk 6 in Assignment link dropbox) 

Week 7 Consult

Present instructional units.

Work as a Teaching or Training Consultant

12

 

No required discussion board unless you missed one earlier.

Actually give the Training/Teaching Presentation to live audience. 

Upload a segment of your Presentation for peers to see and discuss each other's work. 

Week 8 Reflect

Present instructional units.

Work as a Teaching or Training Consultant

No new readings

 

Self-Reflection Essay Week 8 (in week 8 discussion)

Final Exam or Self-Publish Unit or Apply to Teach at Park University--due by Friday.

Core Assessment Revision due by Friday, if needed.

 

 

Start Here (Q/A)

Welcome to Communication Teaching, Training, and Consulting

 

Here is a brief overview to this course. Answers to student questions are posted below so everyone will know the answers.

 

Major Weekly Assignments

See the "Assignments:" link on the left for all major weekly assignments due weeks 2-8.  This approach gives you access to all course assignments throughout the whole term.

 

Dropboxes are under the "Assignments:" link.

 

The instructional unit--core assessment--is due week 6!

 

The course syllabus is located here: http://www.park.edu/syllabus/list.aspx

Really, this course will be fun, pragmatic, and useful!  

Student Submitted Questions Answered Below

 

Q. I am a bit confused. I completed items for week 1 this week because I spent some of last week and the weekend out of town dealing with an ill parent, but am not sure I will receive credit for it.  I have a 0.

A. You didn't post for the first week, so you didn't earn any credit.  For the first two weeks, you have until the end of week 2 to submit everything. That gives everyone a little extra time to figure out the course. After that, everyone has one week for the assignments.

I grade assignments once a week. I grade assignments within one week of the due date, not according to when they are submitted.

Q. I also did not realize the quiz for that week would no longer be available.

A. The quiz is a self-check to prepare for the final and available for one week.

Q. I am trying to get into the swing but am a bit confused on the expectations. Do you want us to focus on postings from the learning activities or student interaction.

A. Those are all part of the same assignment for the Discussion Board. Under the "Assignments" link at the left of the eCollege screen, there is a detailed explanation of expectations for the Discussion Board.

Q. Am I suppose to be preparing a class unit along with the weekly activities?

A. Yes, see the Core Assignment--and weekly stages of that project--under the "Assignments" link. The discussion board is about reading and discussing the textbook readings and learning activities. The core assessment is preparation of a 2-hour instructional unit.

Q. Although I would love to, I am not currently working in a teaching or training capacity, so that is a bit of a challenge. My plan for this  class is to prepare information and material for interpersonal communication, so I hope that will be okay.

A. Fine, but select a narrower, manageable unit within that area.

Q.  As I can see that other students post each learning activity per chapter in one large posting. Is this what you are looking to be posted on or by Friday? is this deadline by 12am cst?

A. I think short posts--each on a different topic--are easier to read.  Textbook learning activities should be done by Friday.  Others should be by Sunday.  Previously, the unit closes Sunday Denver time, although we're supposed to expect Kansas City time.

Q. Readings (Required. Due Sunday)
What is a fact from the unit materials that gained your attention?
What unit are you referring to the ( Training & develop text) or the text the we plan to teach (pr). Are we to be reading both text at the same time?

A. The unit or week to discuss is the material assigned to read in the Beebe book each week.  The reading assignments are on the syllabus and the course home page.  If you scroll down on the homepage screen, you'll see the weekly or unit assignments in the Beebe book. You need to read whatever sources you need to prepare an instructional core assessment in the subject area you decide to teach.  Look in the "Assignments:" link for an explanation of the various assignments due each week.

Q. The teaching unit on PR is your core assessment assignment.  You put weekly progress in the dropbox.  You'll see the assignments under the Assignment link.  I will give you feedback on this after you submit the first assignment.

A. For the Discussion Board, you have two required posts and others are choices so you can post what means the most to you.  

Q. Interactive responses to other students in the class.
You have two weeks to post, then each discussion will be available for only one week. ??????????


A. It takes people a little while to figure out a course.  So week one and week two are due by week two.  After that, week three is due week three.  Week four is due week four.  Week five is due week five.  Week six is due week six.

Q. Program Goal for Teaching, Training, Consulting / Is this relevant to the PR text or training text

A. This course is called Teaching, Training, and Consulting.  The program goals for this course apply to everyone, no matter what topic they decide to use in their core assessment.
 

Q. I haven't received the free textbooks for this course.

 

A. Your professor cannot provide free textbooks. You will need to buy:

Beebe, S. A., Mottet, T. P., and Roach, K. D. (2004). Training and development: Enhancing communication and leadership skills. Allyn & Bacon. Used copies should be available.

 

For the instructional unit you prepare on a particular content area--interpersonal communication, public speaking, public relations--you can use any textbook on that subject from a local library or buy your own.

 

If you tell your professor what course you'd like to teach at Park University, your professor will ask a publisher to send you a desk copy you can use while teaching the course. This process may take weeks and is the publisher's choice.

 

Students who are preparing a Leadership Practices Inventory unit will not be teaching that course for Park University. If you plan on taking CA 670 Measuring Leadership with Aitken or you hope to provide a real workshop for your employer, you'll want to buy the full Facilitator's package. It's out of print, which is why our bookstore cannot sell it to you, but you should be able to find it online: http://www.amazon.com/Leadership-Practices-Inventory-LPI-Facilitators/dp/0787967289/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1223643333&sr=8-3 

 

Course Developer Contact: Joan Aitken

 

Course description: Students analyze the theory and practice of developing and presenting communication training sessions for organizations. Students prepare for the role of the training consultant by creating a training unit for sale or publication.

 

COMMUNICATION AND LEADERSHIP PROGRAM GOALS FOR TEACHING, TRAINING, CONSULTING

  • To provide a forum for the exchange of ideas between students and organizational leaders concerning the requirements to achieve excellence.

  • To combine theoretical knowledge and practical skills to resolve organizational issues and improve decision-making.

  • To develop a framework for ethical conduct in contemporary organizations.

 

Learning Outcomes

The student will be able to

1. Design course management elements, including behavioral objectives.

2. Analyze effective methods of training and development.

3. Prepare, present, and assess training units, which are organized around a Needs-Centered model of training.

4. Apply best practices in teaching public speaking and interpersonal communication.

5. Evaluate contemporary instructional communication research, which can be applied in organizational contexts.

6. Apply needs assessment questionnaires, task analysis, training plans, and other planning and evaluation tools.

7. Demonstrate effective use of training technology.

9. Create a business model for contract work in training and development.

 

Relax.  If you have questions, just contact your professor by phone or email!

 

Before long, you will be having sweet dreams about teaching and training.  

 

If you don't hear back from your professor in a day or two, he or she may be busy.

 

 

Or your professor may not have noticed your email or understand your phone message.  

 

Just send or call again.

 

 

 

 

 

Textbooks

Required:

Beebe, S. A., Mottet, T. P., and Roach, K. D. (2004). Training and development: Enhancing communication and leadership skills. Allyn & Bacon.

 

Options (Feel free to use an appropriate textbook from your local library.)

APA (2001). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association. 5th ed. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. 

K & P Materials: The Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI)-Deluxe Facilitator's Guide Package (Loose-leaf, with CD-ROM Scoring Software, Self/Observer, Workbook, Planner & copy of The Leadership Challenge book ) (3rd ed.) by Kouzes and Posner. Jossey-Bass, 2003.

Lucas, S. E. Art of Public Speaking-+ Learning Tools Suite, 9th edition, McGraw, 2007 or latest edition. ISBN 0073228656

Natalle, E. J. (2007). Teaching interpersonal communication: Resources and readings. Bedford/St. Martin’s.

Verderber, K. S., Verderber, R. F., & Berryman-Fink, C. (2006). Inter-act: Interpersonal communication concepts, skills, and contexts. (10th or latest ed). New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780195300642 or ISBN 0195300645

 This book give a readable and modern approach to research-based information about interpersonal communication. You will find helpful resources at the textbook's publisher website: http://www.us.oup.com/us/companion.websites/019516847X/ You can access the detailed website through your CD-ROM in the back of the book.

 

 

 

 

Example Assignment Grading

There are 100 points possible in the course. 100% = 100 points. A typical way of approaching grading is to use percentages.
90-100 = A
80-89.99 = B
70-79.99 = C
60-69.99 = D
Below 60 = F

 

Example Assignment Weight All assignments and their weights are the decision of your professor.  See the eCollege gradebook for details about grading.

 

Alternative Viewpoints Welcome! If you have an alternative assignment you'd like to do in this course, just make arrangements with your professor by week two. You will want to adapt the core assessment project to be appropriate for your goals.

Are you a holistic thinker? Excellent, then approach the assignments from your perspective and feel free to be creative. Because your professor uses mastery learning, if there's a problem with an assignment, you'll simply need to revise the assignment to meet learning objectives.

Are you a linear thinker? Excellent, there are step-by-step guidelines you can follow for each assignment. Let your professor know if you have questions.

 

 

 

Week 1 Overview to Teaching, Training, and Consulting

Chapter 1

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Objectives
1. Define training.
2. Compare training with the processes of education, development, motivation, and consulting.
3. Describe three approaches to consulting.
4. Define and describe the communication process.
5. List skills that are frequently presented in communication, leadership, and management training seminars and workshops.
6. Identify and describe the nine steps involved in designing and presenting a training workshop.
 

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Chapter Overview
This chapter presents an overview that compares training to education and other methods of enhancing organizational effectiveness. Training may be part of the overall process of organizational development when the need is for employees to develop certain skills in order to more effectively perform a specific job or task.
The needs centered model of communication training is described.
 

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Chapter Lecture
I. Training is the process of developing skills in order to more effectively perform a specific job or task.
A. Communication, leadership, and management training involves teaching “people skills”.
1. A skill is an ability to do something as opposed to knowing something.
2. The goal of communication training is the performance of an observable and measurable skill that can be assessed in some way.
3. Over $200 billion dollars is spent annually on organizational training.
B. Education is the process of imparting knowledge or education.
1. Emphasizes knowledge.
2. Emphasizes achieving often in comparison to the knowledge level of others.
3. Emphasizes an open system perspective where there are many ways to achieve the goal.
a. Emphasizes knowledge that is not linked to a specific job or career.
b. Emphasizes an open ended approach where not every step in the process is described.
C. Training is the process of developing skills for a specific job or task.
1. Emphasizes doing rather than knowing.
2. Emphasizes achieving a certain level of skill attainment.
3. Emphasizes a closed system perspective with specific right and wrong ways of performing a skill.
4. Emphasizes a comprehensive listing and description of the skills required to perform a specific behavior.

 

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II. Motivation is useful for change.
A. Motivation is an internal state of readiness to take action or achieve a goal.
1. Motivation speakers seek change by using emotions to encourage people to take action to achieve a worthwhile goal.
2. Trainers seek change through teaching skills.
B. Change may require more than an emotional state of readiness.
1. Motivational messages may not have staying power.
2. Listeners may still need strategies and skills to enact change.

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III. Organizational development is linked to both training and human resources.
A. Development is any behavior, strategy, design, structuring, skill or skill set, strategic plan or motivational effort that is designed to produce growth or change over time.
1. Development encompasses education and training.
2. Combining training and development suggests training is designed to achieve a broader function than performing a specific skill.
3. Organizations may hire consultants to offer insight, advice, wisdom, research, or experience based intervention strategies to help solve the organization’s problems.
B. Communication or management consultants provide advice about some aspect of the organization’s communication or leadership.

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IV. There are three different approaches to consulting.
A. The Purchase approach is used when a member of the organization has diagnosed the problem and purchases a solution from the consultant.
B. The Doctor-Patient approach is used when the consultant diagnoses the problem and recommends a solution.
C. The Process approach uses a variety of assessment measures to determine the overall vitality of an organization and recommend strategies for improvement.
V. Understanding “Soft Skills”
A. “Soft Skills” are skills that focus on managing people, information, and ideas.
B. Communication and leadership skills are “soft skills” that are valued in the workplace.


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VI. Defining Communication
A. Human communication is the process of making sense out of the world and sharing that sense with others by creating meaning by verbal and nonverbal messages.
1. It is inescapable.
2. It is irreversible.
3. It is complicated.
4. It emphasizes both content and relationships.
5. It is governed by rules.

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B. Communication is described as a transactive process in which both sender and receiver of a message simultaneously express and respond to messages.
1. The sender is the originator of the message.
2. The receiver is the person who decodes or makes sense of the message.
3. The message is the written, spoken, and unspoken elements of communication to which we assign meaning.
4. The channel is the pathway through which messages are sent.
5. Noise is interfering messages that decreases the accuracy of the communication.
6. Feedback is response to the message.
7. Context is the physical and psychological communication environment.


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VII. Communication, management, and leadership training is designed to teach people specific skills that will enhance the quality of messages and human relationships.
A. Helping people enhance the quality of communication is a positive, direct way of helping an organization become more effective.
B. Understanding communication as a transactive process helps learners understand and learn the skills taught in communication training.


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VIII. The needs-centered model of communication training.
A. Identify and understand the needs of the organization and the specific trainees.
1. Learn what the trainees need to know.
2. Analyze what the organization needs to achieve its mission.
3. Determine how training can help address those needs.
B. Analyze the training task.
C. Develop training objectives.
D. Organize training content.
E. Determine training methods.
F. Select training resources.
G. Complete training plans
H. Deliver training.
I. Assess training.

 

Chapter 2

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Objectives
 
1. Define and explain learning.
2. List and explain the three general laws of learning.
3. Differentiate andragogy from pedagogy.
4. List and explain the five principles of andragogy.
5. Define learning style.
6. Differentiate visual, aural, and kinesthetic learners and explain how trainers can
accommodate these types of learners.
7. Differentiate reflective and impulsive learners and explain how trainers can
accommodate these types of learners.
8. Differentiate whole-part and part-whole learners and explain how trainers can
accommodate these types of learners.
9. Differentiate divergers, assimilators, convergers, and accommodators and explain
how trainers can accommodate these types of learners.
10. Differentiate the matching, bridging, and style-flexing approaches to training.


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Chapter Overview
 
This chapter helps students understand the three general laws of learning that are relevant to the training practitioner, explains and compares the concepts of pedagogy and andragogy, explains different learning styles, and offers suggestions on how to apply this information to a training session.

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Chapter Lecture
 
I. Learning is a change in individuals, due to the interaction of the individuals and their environment, which fills a need and makes them more capable of dealing adequately with their environment.
A. After trainees have learned something, trainers should be able to recognize changes in the trainee’s behavior and attitudes.
B. Change addresses the need or reason for training.
C. New behavior or attitude allows trainees to more effectively manage their environment.


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II. A law of learning is a statement that describes the condition that must be met in order for trainees to learn.
A. The law of effect states that people learn best under pleasant and rewarding circumstances.
1. Create a pleasant physical environment.
a. Classrooms that are well lighted, temperature controlled, and clean promote learning.
b. Large table and chairs arranged in a horseshoe or circle invite interaction and allow trainees room to spread out.
2. Accommodate the trainees’ work schedule by allowing trainees to choose from a list of training times.
3. Schedule appropriate breaks to allow for a change of scenery and/or refreshments after about 90 minutes.
B. The law of frequency suggests that the more often you practice a trained behavior, the more likely you will continue using the trained behavior.
1. Make sure trainees are practicing the correct skills.
2. Use “plus-one” mastery technique to learn a process one step at a time while adding a new step to the steps already mastered.
3. Have trainees train the trainer by switching roles.
C. The law of association suggests that every new fact, idea, concept, or behavior is best learned if you can relate it to or with something you already know.
1. Use analogies
2. Compare and contrast with other familiar processes.


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III. Teaching and training adults is not the same as teaching and training young students.
A. Pedagogy is the science and art of teaching children.
1. Children learn for learning’s sake.
2. Children have limited life experience on which to build (limited schema).
3. Children are motivated by external rewards or punishment.
4. Children are more dependent on others for what they “should” know.
5. Children are learning to learn and approach learning subject by subject.
B. Andragogy is the science and art of teaching adults.


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IV. Applying the five assumptions of andragogy.
A. Adult learners need to see the meaning and relationship of what they are learning to their lives and experience.
1. A needs assessment will identify what learners do not yet know or the important or necessary skills they can’t yet perform.
2. Train employees for their “in baskets” - those action items that need immediate attention.
B. Adult learners will use their own experience and information in the classroom.
1. Get information from trainees about how training can be applied immediately.
2. Negative experience can be used in a positive way.
a. Acknowledge their less than positive experiences and empathize with trainees.
b. Suggest that training can be used to reduce the number of negative experiences.
c. Ask trainees how new training content might address some negative experiences.
d. Place the negative experiences in context.
C. Adult learners tend to be self or internally motivated.
1. They are motivated by increased job satisfaction, self esteem, sense of accomplishment, and quality of life issues.
2. Job promotions or terminations may provide motivation to learn.
3. Challenge employees to focus on the task.
4. Set realistic expectations and provide constant support, praise,
encouragement, and constructive feedback.
D. Adult learners are self directed and know their learning deficiencies.
1. Make training “needs based” or “learner centered”.
2. Encourage self directed learning to allow trainees to target their specific problems and control their own stop and start times.
3. Make training timely by providing smaller chunks of “just in time” information when it is needed.
4. Coach trainees through mistakes by providing a safe environment and address performance deficiencies using specific behavioral and descriptive terms.
E. Adult learners are task or problem centered.
1. Group trainees by years of experience or types of problems experienced.
2. Ask trainees to forward problems ahead of time so they can be addressed in training.
3. Provide trainees with a bibliography or set of resources.
4. Provide trainees with a series of training classes ranging from basic to more complex.


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V. Learning styles are the ways individuals perceive, organize, process and remember information.
A. Perceptual differences (modalities) include auditory, visual, or kinesthetic learners.
1. Learners may prefer learning in one, two, or all three modalities.
2. Visual and mixed visual and auditory are the most common modalities with
each accounting for 30% of the U.S. population.
3. 25% of the population prefers using the auditory modality.
4. 15% prefers the kinesthetic or tactile modality.
C. Visual learners learn by reading or viewing.
1. Training for visual learners will provide modeling, an opportunity for observation of appropriate behavior by others.
2. Use of prepackaged materials, handouts, flip charts, chalkboard and electronic presentation software will be preferred.
a. Set realistic expectations for trainees.
b. Model real, true to life behavior.
c. Praise models for their behavior: acknowledge and reward successful work.
d. Use models that are similar to trainees.
D. Aural (or auditory) learners learn though hearing or speaking.
1. They clarify their understanding by articulating what they learn.
2. Use peer presentations, lectures, audiocassettes and sound tracks.
E. Kinesthetic learners learn by touching and doing.
1. They are partial to action and prefer to be engaged in movement.
2. Engage learners by using simulations, case studies, role playing, and demonstrations.


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VI. Learning styles can be approached by looking at learning time differences.
A. Reflective learners take time to process information and are concerned with accuracy and precision.
1. Allow ample time for trainees to complete work.
2. Set realistic learning objectives.
B. Impulsive learners quickly process information and complete tasks and are less concerned with accuracy and precision.
1. Discourage impulsive learners by not rewarding quantity over quality.
2. Limiting time may encourage quantity.

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VII. Learning styles can be approached by looking at information processing differences.
A. Whole-part learners prefer having the big picture before moving into the details of the concept or idea.
1. These learners need a schema or way to organize big ideas before receiving detailed information.
2. Training applications include showing the trainees what the product will look like when completed before breaking it down into its various parts.
3. Use demonstrations or other visual representations.
B. Part-whole learners prefer learning the small parts or details before learning the big picture.
1. Show the trainees the various parts that make up the whole product.
2. Use demonstrations of other visual representations.


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VIII. The Kolb Learning Style Inventory can be used as a diagnostic instrument to identify a learning style preference.
A. Divergers prefer observing a situation rather than taking action.
1. They are innovative, imaginative, and concerned with personal relevance.
2. They need to know how new information relates to prior experiences before learning new information.
3. Make use of buzz groups, brainstorming, and mentor/mentee relationships.
B. Assimilators learn by listening to experts and prefer sequentially ordering information into logical forms.
1. Make use of lectures, presentations by experts, and assigning individual research projects.
C. Convergers learn by analyzing problems and doing the work themselves.
1. They prefer to find solutions by thinking logically through problems.
2. Introduce new problem-solving processes, demonstrate these processes, and
use “problem based” training methods such as case studies, simulations, and
role plays.
D. Accomodators learn by “hands on” field experience and by trial and error.
1. Conduct experiments
2. Place trainees in the field or in an internship program.

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IX. Applying the learning styles information to develop and present training programs.
A. Don’t assume everyone learns like you do.
B. Don’t always train in the way you were trained.
C. Use a variety of training techniques and methods to tap into all learning styles.
1. Matching involves using the trainees’ preferred learning style.
2. Bridging includes accommodating individual trainee’s learning styles when they are having difficulty.
3. Style-flexing accommodates and challenges trainees by learning in ways that are different from their preferred learning styles.

 

Chapter 3

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Objectives
 
1. Explain why a needs assessment is crucial to developing a successful training program.
2. List, describe, compare and contrast the affective, cognitive, and psychomotor domains of learning.
3. Develop a well-worded needs-assessment survey.
4. Conduct interviews to assess learner needs.
5. Use appropriate observation methods to assess learner needs.
6. Describe and use appropriate assessment tests to identify learner needs.
7. Write an effective task analysis of a skill appropriate for training.


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Chapter Overview
 
This chapter presents the initial steps in designing a training workshop by describing the process of developing needs assessments for the three domain of learning and developing a task analysis of skill to be taught.


 

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Chapter Lecture
 
I. A needs assessment is a systematic method of determining what skills or deficiencies are needed in order to design an effective training program.
A. Identify what learners do not yet know or the important or necessary skills they can’t perform.
B. Identify what skills and information learners already possess.
C. Assessing trainee needs is the primary way to pinpoint the problem.
D. Confirm that a problem really exists, and develop solutions that may involve training to help manage the problem.


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II. Training may involve different domains of learning.
A. The cognitive domain emphasizes remembering facts, knowledge, principles and theories.
B. The affective domain focuses on changing attitudes, feelings, enhancing motivation, and on enhancing the value or appreciation for something.
C. The psychomotor domain focuses on teaching people behavior or skills.

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III. Conducting a needs assessment may involve several methods.
A. Surveys (or questionnaires) are a series of written questions or statements to gain responses from others to learn about their knowledge, attitudes, or behavior related to your training topic.
1. They may be tailor-made to suit your specific training topic.
2. It is critical to develop clear unbiased questions in order to get accurate information.
B. Surveys can utilize several formats.
1. Likert scales offer a statement and then ask to what degree a respondent agrees, is undecided, or disagrees with the statement.
2. These can be used to measure attitudes, behavior, or skill level.
3. Check lists provide a list of skills and knowledge and asks respondents to indicate their degree of need for the information.
4. Yes and no responses may be used when you need a direct response.
5. Rank order is used to allow respondents to indicate the importance of specific skills and behaviors.
C. Multiple choice questions allow a limited number of choices for a respondent to select.
1. The stem is the question or statement to which you want respondents to select their responses.
2. The foils are the choices following the stem.
D. Open ended questions provide no structure for a respondents’ response.
E. 360 Survey method seeks information from the employee and the employees colleagues, subordinates, and supervisors.
F. Interviews are oral interactions structured to gather information.
1. A focus group interview is conducted by a moderator who asks open ended questions to allow group members to share their views.
2. Interviews may provide richer information because the trainer can ask follow up questions and probe for more detailed explanations.
3. Interviews require more time and skill than other survey methods.
a. The opening of the interview should put the interviewee at ease and develop rapport.
b. The middle of the interview should address the essence of the information.
c. The end of the interview can provide the respondent with a chance to provide general comments or ask questions.
d. Interviews should not be taped or recorded without the consent of the respondent.
G. Observation Methods can be used to assess needs by observing the respondents performing skills you will cover in training.
H. Assessment tests can identify proficiencies or weaknesses in job skills.
I. Results of needs assessments should always remain confidential unless the people completing the assessment instruments give you permission.

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IV. Strategies to assess needs without using the time and money for a formal needs assessment.
A. Make the first training event of the training session a needs assessment activity about the trainee’s experiences.
B. Contact trainees prior to the workshop to ask what they would like to learn.
C. Ask the person who hired or invited you to train what they can share about the trainees’ needs, interests, and attitudes.
D. Ask arriving trainees about their background and interest in the training topic.
E. Ask attending trainees what they would like to learn and demonstrate at the end of training and how these topics have been addressed.
F. Develop a pre-session questionnaire to cover the trainee’s background, experience, or expectations for the training.

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V. Analyzing the training task requires a task analysis that provides a step by step outline of the behaviors and knowledge that are needed to perform the desired behavior. 

 

A task analysis is a step-by-step procedure that the student will learn. The task analysis describes all mental and physical characteristics. Use complete sentences so the ideas are clear. An annotated bibliography gives a paragraph description of each source.


A. You become knowledgeable about the skill you are teaching by conducting research.
B. The skills should be organized in the order they will be taught and performed.
C. The needs assessment will help determine what is included in the training based on
knowledge and level of need.

 

Here are some web resources that will provide additional information about task analysis;

http://classweb.gmu.edu/ndabbagh/Resources/Resources2/taskanalysis2.htm

http://www.valdosta.edu/~jhummel/psy310/!bos&ta.htm

 

Here is an example Task Analysis for writing as essay if you miss a weekly assignment in this course.

Assignment:  Write an additional essay of 750-100 words to accompany your late assignment.

1.  Select the topic for your essay: 

    a.  Sequential learning,

    b. The value of learning over time,

    c. The value of providing prompt feedback to learners/training, or

    d. The ethics of fair treatment of students/trainees.

2. Use the ERIC database or Wilson Education Index (if you have access) to find several peer-reviewed, scholarly articles on the topic of your choice.

3.  Select research-based information from 5 sources you plan to use in your essay.

4.  Write the body of the essay, using about three key ideas, an organizing the sources according to those ideas. 

5.  Use APA citation style to indicate the source of quoted or paraphrased information.

6.  Write and introduction to the essay, which concludes with the thesis statement.

7.  Write the conclusion to the essay.

8.  Use the word count function to check the number of words for the essay to see if it has between 750-1000 words, and adjust accordingly.

9.  Add a page titled References at the end of the essay and include an APA reference listing for each source cited in the essay.

 

 

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Different people in this course have different objectives. You may want to teach an onground or online course for Park University. You may want to do training for your employer. You may want to publish instructional materials. In this course, you will want to pursue your interests, including the specific content area you want to teach or train AND in regards to what your personal goals are for being in this course.

 

In the discussion board, please post a substantive post (minimum 250 words) about your personal goals and individual objectives for your learning in this course. I recommend that you prepare the reflective essay in Microsoft Word, then when complete, cut and paste the essay into the discussion board. Be sure to discuss how you plan to achieve your goals and objectives.

 

Learning Activities for Chapter 1

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1. Education versus training
 
Think of your past experiences when you were involved in situations that had training as a goal. How were these experiences different from their usual classroom experiences in college?
 
2. Why training is important?
 
Using a current or imaginary work situation, recommend a topic for communication-based training. Build an argument for why it is important and how the training will benefit the company.

3. Complete the "Analyzing your Training Skill” worksheet. This will also provide instructors with an overview of the skills, knowledge, and current practices.


Analyzing Your Training Skill1
 
Rate your training skill using a 1 to 10 scale. 1= low skill. 10 = high skill Today Desired
I effectively identify and assess what trainees need to learn using effective needs assessment tools.
 
I perform well organized task analysis of the training skills I want to teach.
 
I can write training objectives that are observable, measurable, attainable, and specific.
 
I effectively organize material that trainees need to learn.
 
I use a variety of effective training methods during a training session.
 
I use effective training resources such as overhead projectors and computer generated graphics.
 
I develop and use high quality lesson plans and facilitator guides.
 
I use effective delivery skills when training.
 
I systematically and effectively evaluate training I conduct.
 
I use adult learning principles when designing and delivering training.
 
I effectively manage difficult trainees.
1 Adapted from Beebe, S.A. (Summer 2000). Communication Training: Resources and Strategies

 

What are your strengths and weaknesses?


 

Learning Activities for Chapter 2

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1. Teaching the laws of learning:
 
In the Discussion Board, discuss the following concepts:
a. Law of effect
b. Law of frequency
c. Law of association
 
2. Learning styles
 
Consider the differences in learning styles and how these styles may affect the learning outcomes and attention of their trainees.
 
First, review the four learning style modalities and identify your own primary learning style preference.
 
1. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each learning style preference. For example, a kinesthetic learner may have difficulty concentrating when asked to sit and read as they would prefer to be actively involved.
2. Select a simple topic for a training exercise. (This can be something as simple as making a paper airplane.)
3. Come up with a teaching method that will address each different learning style. For example, how would they design training on this topic for an auditory learner?

4. Previously in school, what have you been told about your individual learning style? For example, are you right brained (holistic) or left brained (linear)? For example, when you communicate and learn, do you prefer learning using logic? Working independently? Using language? Listening? Using hands=on? Working with others? Seeing visuals?

5. Take this test: http://www.web-us.com/brain/braindominance.htm

What do your results say?

6. Look at the dancer http://www.news.com.au/perthnow/story/0,21598,22492511-5005375,00.html

Clockwise? Counterclockwise? What is the implication?

7. If you have time, here is another test similar to the first one. http://www.testcafe.com/lbrb/lbrb.html

 

Learning Activities for Chapter 3

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1. Learning domains
 
Chapter 3 in the text offers a “Train the Trainer” Check list. Complete the checklist. Discuss your results.

2. Task analysis
 
With the high interest in do-it-yourself projects and online training, there is an abundance of information available that involves a task analysis of a skill. This information breaks each task down into small steps that can be completed with the end result being the successful completion of the task or project. Explore some Internet sites on the topic, including some you find on your own.

As an example, you can go to an Internet service provider and find instructions on how to send an Email. They should look something like this:
 
To send email
 
1. Select the “Write new mail” icon on the toolbar.
2. In the Send To: box in the Write Mail window, type the e-mail address of the person to whom you want to send e-mail. (To send the same message to another person, type a comma and add the next e-mail address.)
3. In the Subject: box, type a subject line for your e-mail.
4. Type your message in the large message box.
5. When you have finished, click Send Now or Send Later.
 
Notice that this skill is broken down into a series of small steps that must be completed in sequence in order to the process to work. Although in this particular instance, the first four steps could be completed in any order, they all must be completed in order for the task to be successfully completed.
 
This is only one example. Conduct your own research about instructions on sending Email and compare their steps to those shown above. There are many ways to present the information. The important thing to remember is that it is broken down into steps.

 

Example 1 - Example 2
 
3. Creating a task analysis (This exercise can be used with Chapter 3 or Chapter 4)
 
Create a task analysis for a simple task that they have completed many times. Assume a level of knowledge in their trainees and analyze the task itself by breaking it down into a series of small steps that must be performed in sequence in order to complete the task.
 

 

Week 2 Plan

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What will your expectations be?

Chapter 4

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Chapter Objectives
 
1. Write training objectives that are observable, measurable, attainable, and specific.
2. Organize training curriculum according to the principle of chronological order.
3. Organize training curriculum according to the principle of teaching simple skills
before complex skills.
4. Teach a skill by showing, inviting, encouraging, and correcting.
5. Perform a set induction for a training session.
6. Use examples of stimulus variation.
7. Provide closure to a training session.

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Chapter Overview
 
This chapter discusses the importance of developing and writing clear training objectives, organizing and constructing your training curriculum, and strategies for teaching skills.

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Chapter Lecture
 
I. Training objectives provide the direction for the training presentation by identifying what the trainees should be able to do when they complete the training.
A. A training goal is a more general statement about what you want to accomplish.
B. A training objective is a precise, specific outcome you are tying to achieve.
C. Training objectives are selected based on the results of the needs assessment.
II. Training objectives should meet the criteria of being observable, measurable, attainable, and specific.
A. An objective is observable if someone could verify whether the desired behavior did or did not occur.
B. An objective is measurable if you can assess how accurately or effectively the behavior was performed.
1. An objective is attainable if it is realistic to expect that trainees can achieve a level of competency based on the trainees’ background, ability, and the amount of time for training.
2. An objective is specific if it includes a criteria based objective or specific guidelines to describe what the trainees should do.


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III. Designing curriculum requires the trainer to identify the overall plan for presenting the information and teaching the skills in the training program.
A. Teach skills in chronological order (organizing information in a time sequence).
B. Teach simple skills before more complex skills so trainees can build on their skills.

IV. Training methods for teaching skills involve the steps of tell, show, invite, encourage, and correct errors.
A. Tell trainees what you want them to do.
1. Describe the skill in a short lecture.
2. Have trainees read a short description of the skill.
3. Have an expert describe or perform the skill.
4. Describe the skill in chronological order or from simplest to most complex.
B. Show trainees the skill by performing or demonstrating.
C. Invite trainees to perform the skill by planning a role play, case study, simulation, or group or individual practice.
1. Trainees appreciate working on an actual project that will transfer to their job.
2. Have trainees practice easy skills first to build confidence and gain
proficiency.
D. Encourage trainees by pointing out what they are doing correctly before offering
what they are doing wrong.
1. Correct trainees by offering specific suggestion for improving their
performance.
a. Feedback can come from trainees themselves, trainees’ observers, or by
providing examples of the skill.
b. Trainees should receive both encouraging and corrective feedback.

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V. Learning is more likely to occur when learners are actively involved in material that directly relates to them.
A. Set induction is a technique that helps get your trainees ready to learn.
1. You must determine what will motivate listeners to learn.
2. The goal is to have the trainees verbally or mentally respond that they are ready to learn.
3. Motivation to learn comes from the promise that learners’ needs will be met by the training.
4. Use a demonstration, analogy, story, quotation, cartoon, statistic, or rhetorical question to open the set.
B. Vary the stimulus to keep trainees’ attention and involvement in the training.
1. Move to a different method or learning activity every twenty minutes.
2. Strategies can be used to provide stimulus variation.
a. Movement
b. Verbal focusing
c. Nonverbal focusing
d. Change interaction style
e. Use pauses
f. Reading
g. Visual aids
h. Audio aids
C. Closure provides a conclusion to one element of the lesson and points to what is next.
1. Summarizes what has been discussed.
2. Provides a psychological conclusion to what was learned.
a. Values the material
b. Shows how new information and skill can be beneficial.
c. Points trainees to the next phase of the training.
 

Chapter 5

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Chapter 5 Objectives
 
1. Identify and locate credible sources of training topics, content, and materials.
2. Identify criteria to evaluate training resource material obtained from the Internet.
3. Explain advantages and disadvantages in internal and external content sources.
4. List and describe implications for training about copyright laws, citing sources, and
how to obtain permission for information used in training sessions.
5. Develop a content outline for a training session.


 

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Chapter Overview
 
This chapter offers strategies for using training objectives as starting points for developing training content by using internal sources from experience and external sources from research.
 

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Chapter Lecture
 
I. Developing content for training involves a systematic process to find and develop information from a variety of sources.
A. Internal sources include what you already know from experiences, ideas, and knowledge.
B. External sources cover research, knowledge, and experience you don’t personally have.
C. Internet sources can be found through search engines or specific training sites.
1. Critically evaluate information found on websites.
a. Accountability
b. Accuracy of information
c. Objectivity
d. Date
e. Usability
2. Over reliance on using websites may omit sources that have not been published on the web.
D. Library sources
1. Books and textbooks
2. Periodicals and periodical indexes
3. Full text databases
4. Newspapers
5. References resources for statistics, quotations, and definitions.
6. Government documents
E. Expert resources
1. Professionals
2. Educators
F. Commercial sources
1. Published training books, manuals, and websites.
2. Carefully consider if the training is based on research.
3. Be mindful of ethical and copyright issues when using material.


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II. Processing external materials involves refining and assessing the raw material you have gathered.
A. Evaluate the quality of the material
1. Is it relevant to your training objectives?
2. Is it appropriate for the amount of time you have for training?
3. Is it appropriate for the culture and background of your training group?
4. Is it appropriate for the knowledge level and educational level of the trainees?


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III. Consider whether material is covered under copyright laws.
A. Written permission of the copyright holder is necessary when using material that has been published.
1. Plagiarism is the use of ideas, words, and work of others as if it were your own.
B. Fees may be charged for using information if you are using it to make a profit.
1. Contact the publishing company who holds copyright to material.
2. Obtain a signed release form to keep in your files.
C. Make use of public domain materials, materials you develop, or obtain written permission to use copyrighted material.
D. Give credit for material that was written by someone else.
1. Bibliographies
2. Footnotes


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IV. Preparing training content outlines
A. Present an overview of steps needed to enhance the skills being taught.
B. Emphasize skills rather than theory.
 

Classroom Management

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There are an array of administrative details, grading, record keeping, and behavior management details, which you will need to figure out for your teaching or training work.

 

How will you weight grades? Keep attendance? Submit attendance? Advise students or employees?

Will you use mastery learning so that people can revise their work? Will you dock grades if assignments are late? Faculty typically use one or more of these policies:

What if students fail to complete assignments?

What if you expect a round of speeches and no one is ready?

How will you know you have more than enough to do in each class so you don't have dead time? What will your backup plans be?

 

VIDEO--WHEN THE CHIPS ARE DOWN

 

One of the biggest problems when a person has a learning disability is managing the student's or employee's behavior. Effective teachers and supervisors have a knowledge base about how these students or employees function and why they do what they do. First, you need to develop a guiding philosophy so you can pull it close when you're in trouble.

 

Develop an understanding of positive versus negative feedback. Positive feedback changes behavior. Negative only stops--does not change--behavior.

 

Changing behavior doesn't happen as quickly as we'd like. Successive approximations. Students and employees with learning disabilities probably won't learn behaviors as quickly as everyone else. Think about how a student or employee learns language. We reinforce each step toward the goal. As we reinforce the behavior, it grows and improves. Use the same approach in changing other behaviors.

 

REINFORCE THE STEPS TOWARD THE DESIRED BEHAVIOR.

 

Performance inconsistency. What's important is how we as adults deal with that inconsistency. Know that people with disabilities often have an inherent inconsistency they cannot totally control. This good day--bad day thing is distressing for the student or employee.  Recognize as part of the profile instead of evidence for the prosecution.

 

THINGS THAT DON'T WORK

 

Corporal punishment. Any physical contact with a student or employee. Don't take the person by the arm, for example. Don't get in their space. You don't know what the student or employee is going to do. Don't touch the student or employee.

 

Forced apology doesn't work, but you can remind that it's a good idea to apologize.

 

Sarcasm doesn't work. These students or employees are extremely literal.

 

Cheap shots don't work. Avoid "gotcha."

 

THINGS THAT WORK.--PREVENTIVE DISCIPLINE

 

We are too reactive with students. We aren't proactive enough with our students.

 

Guide student in advance. Take preventive measures to prevent the problem from occurring in the first place.

 

Students or employees with a learning disability (LD) are change according to the environment, so if you change the environment in supportive ways, they will adapt more easily. Set up an environment where the student or employee can succeed. Most students or employees with LD can't plan and bring structure to their world as easily as you can. They have little internal structure, so you need to provide a predictable structure. They need to have a knowable environment. They don't deal well with surprises. Expectations need to be clear.

 

Set the agenda. Have structures and routines for everything because most people are comfortable with structure. You will change the dynamic by putting up agenda. You and the students or employees can work against the list to complete the list. You can bring a sense of urgency, "Come-on, we're only on item three and we only have 20 minutes left." You'll want to place the most popular things last on the list.

 

Use your voice to manage people. Never yell. A student or employee with LD only hears the yelling, not the message.

 

Broken record technique is a good technique with student or employee who argues. Students or employees may argue for power and control, attention, reinforcement from others, or to derail the lesson or training.  The broken record technique always works if you give an appropriate response with a rationale.  Calmly. . .

You'll want to participate so you can apply the material you are trying to learn.

You'll want to participate so you can apply the material you are trying to learn.

You'll want to participate so you can apply the material you are trying to learn.

You'll want to participate so you can apply the material you are trying to learn.

You'll want to participate so you can apply the material you are trying to learn.

 

You cannot overestimate the effectiveness of praise with students or employees. There are descriptive and evaluative praise. Sometimes we use too much evaluative praise. Use praise in a creative way. "I'm taking a moment of my time to compliment." Collective punishment is NO, NO, NO, but collective reward does work.

 

Use effective conferencing techniques. Think about the conversation. Begin positively and end positively. Put negative in the middle. Always pick the right time to talk. Wait until the moment is right. Pick "where" carefully. Hold the meeting in my office, where say "I'm in charge." For free-flowing exchange, go to neutral turf.

 

Remember that for the person with a learning disability, behavior will be inconsistent. Inconsistency is part of the LD profile. They have good days and bad days, which is why it's so hard to keep motivation.

 

BUILD student or employee SELF ESTEEM

Think of self esteem in terms of poker chips. Need lots. Poker chips pile up when good things happen to a student or employee. Lose poker chips when bad things happen. Students or employees with LD doesn't have enough chips to get in the game. Might play recklessly (bet the whole thing, I don't care) or conservatively (I don't want to do anything). Most students or employees with LD are afraid to risk.

 

GIVE THEM POKER CHIPS. You find the island of competence, the one thing the student or employee does well, and celebrate that. Be a talent scout and find things the student or employee does well. Your job is to make sure every student or employee you deal with has more poker chips at the end of the day. Take away as few as possible and give as many as possible.

 

 

USING TASKS TO MANAGE LEARNING

 

Motivation will improve if the teacher or trainer shifts practices so that students or trainees learn to identify, work on, and master their own goals. This orientation involves modifying six dimensions of the classroom learning environment, called TARGET.

 

TARGET Area

 

Strategies (Au, Mason, & Scheu, 1995, p. 196)

Task

  • Design tasks for novelty, variety, individual challenge, and active involvement.

  • Help students or trainees set realistic, short-term goals.

  • Help students or trainees develop organizational skills for task completion.

Authority

  • Involve students or trainees in decision-making and leadership roles.

  • Help students or trainees develop self-management and self-monitoring skills.

Recognition

  • Recognize individual progress and improvement.

  • Assure equal opportunities for rewards.

Grouping

  • Use flexible and heterogeneous group arrangements.

  • Involve students or trainees in group learning.

Evaluation

  • Give opportunities to improve.

  • Use criteria of individual progress, improvement, and mastery.

  • Involve students or trainees in self-evaluation.

Time

  • Adjust time or task requirements.

  • Use flexible scheduling.

  • Help students or trainees organize and manage their work.

 

Volitions. Volition is a belief that students or trainees can learn, have an interest in learning, and feel a willingness to put forth effort to learn. Volition may not be sufficient to sustain all students or trainees. Some students or trainees need help to understand how to work effectively and successfully.

 

Cognitive activities of selecting, comprehending, remembering, integrating, and monitoring are components in the process of learning.

 

SELECTION ACTIVITIES

  1. Where will I find materials that fit my goals?

  2. What information do I need?

  3. How will I record the information?

  4. How will I use the information?

COGNITIVE ACTIVITIES

 

APPLICATION (Au, Mason, & Scheu, 1995, p. 200)

SELECTION

Activities that facilitate focusing selectively on material

  • Seeking out criterion information

  • Differentiating important from unimportant information

  • Recording important information

  • Organizing and highlighting information

COMPREHENSION

Activities that enhance understanding of the material

  • Previewing the material

  • Noting hard-to-understand points

  • Using context cues

  • Consulting resources and references

MEMORY ENHANCEMENT

Activities that enhance the memorability of the material

  • Reviewing the material

  • Using mnemonic strategies

  • Using self-testing methods

  • Making memory aids 9cahrts, flashcards)

  • Matching study strategies to memory demands of the test

INTEGRATION

Activities that promote integration and the construction of relations

  • Putting material in one's own words

  • Construct ideas/answers that go beyond the information given

  • Using relational aids (diagrams, time lines)

  • Relating information across sources

  • Relating course content to prior knowledge

COGNITIVE MONITORING

Activities that serve to monitor learning and evaluate progress

  • Knowing what you haven't yet mastered

  • Keeping track of personal strengths and weaknesses in processing skill.

SELF-MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES

 

 

TIME MANAGEMENT

Activities that provide the opportunity to learn

  • Establishing sufficient time to complete activities

  • Keeping track of time

  • Scheduling time

  • Meeting time commitments

  • Distributing time over tasks

EFFORT MANAGEMENT

Activities that serve to promote and maintain the disposition to learn

  • Establishing a productive study environment

  • Setting learning and achievement goals

  • Initiating effort

  • Securing the necessary materials

  • Maintaining attention and avoiding distractions

  • Providing incentives to learn

VOLITIONAL MONITORING

Activities that serve to monitor and evaluate the productivity of one's study or work habits

  • Keeping track of the adequacy of time and effort management activities

  • Monitoring attention

  • Assessing strengths and weaknesses in study habits

 

 

Source for this section:

Au, K. H., Mason, J. M., & Scheu, J. A. (1995). Literacy instruction today. New York, NY: Harper Collins College Publishers.

 

 

 

Let's Talk Turkey

Rio Grande Turkey Photographic Print by Robert Franz

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THIS WEEK: Expectations for Students or Trainees

 

No matter what the age of the people being taught or trained, you have probably seen rude and difficult behavior in some circumstances. Just because someone has decided you will be in charge, that doesn't mean you will be. You need to build your credibility and engage students or employees in way they will respect. They need to feel valued.

 

Write a substantive, reflective essay (minimum 250 words) to post about your expectations for students or trainees. If you plan to teach for Park University, include this essay in the portfolio you will submit with your employment application. Here is what Dr. Aitken provides to students: http://JoanAitken.org/Guidelines.html

 

BEGIN NOW FOR NEXT WEEK: CONTENT AREA TEST

You cannot teach or train people if you don't know the content or ideas you are trying to convey. This week, please take the test over the content area you plan to teach. While you are taking the test, think about these questions and answer them through a substantive reflective post in the discussion board. Post a substantive, reflective essay (minimum 250 words) in which you describe how you will prepare effective assessment. You are receiving these questions now so you can think about them for next week!  Please post your answers to the discussion week 3.

 

1. Describe one or more questions you found difficult or confusing. Explain how you would improve the question.

 

2. Objective style questions take longer to prepare, but less time to grade. Essay questions are easy to write, but need a rubric for effective grading. Discuss how you could improve the test through using both types of questions.

 

3. Probably the most common system for writing questions uses Bloom's Taxonomy.

The idea is to assessment on the application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation levels. How can you do that when you assess student or employee work? If you teach for Park University, you will have to use this system in assessing your core assessment.

Here are some links about Bloom's Taxonomy:

http://honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/committees/FacDevCom/guidebk/teachtip/questype.htm

http://www.dbu.edu/faculty/bloompage.html

 

Learning Activities for Chapter 4

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1. Writing training objectives or outcomes
 
Objectives should be observable, measurable, attainable, and specific. Write objectives for the types of learning goals shown below.
 

Type of learning

goal

How is it

observable?

How will it be

measured?

Why it is

attainable?

Is it specific?

Cognitive goal (thinking)

 

 

 

 

Affective goal (feeling)

 

 

 

 

Psychomotor

goal (behavior)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Creating instruments for needs assessments
 
In conducting needs assessments, you will be working with surveys, questionnaires, checklists, yes and no responses, rank order, multiple choice, and open ended questions. Review the example shown below prior to creating their own instruments. (show) You can respond to the questionnaire below and use the results to formulate learning goals and objectives. For your project, you may want to use SurveyMonkey.
 
Using the Internet and Email
Please take a few moments to respond to the questions below. This information will be used when planning upcoming training. Your cooperation is voluntary and all answers will remain confidential.
 

Rate your interest in using the internet for the following:

 

1= Low, 5= high

Registering for courses

1

2

3

4 5

Checking your degree outline

1

2

3

4 5

Scheduling an appointment with an advisor

1

2

3

4 5

Staying in touch with family and friends

1

2

3

4 5

Staying in touch with professors

1

2

3

4 5

Accessing your grades

1

2

3

4 5

 

How often do you send Email? Many times a day
Every day
Several times per week Very seldom
Never
Circle any of the terms you already know:
Blackboard Course

Support System Zip files
CatsWEB

MP3 files
DARS

Address book
HTML

Discussion groups
E mail attachments

Digital Drop Box
Describe one skill you would like to be able to do well by the end of the course:
 

Learning Activities for Chapter 5

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1. Exploring copyrights
 
It is now possible to investigate and secure copyright permission online through the use of copyright clearinghouses. Visit the site for the Copyright Clearance Center, Inc. at https://www.copyright.com/default.asp . You can explore the realm of available services and learn how to secure copyrights electronically. This may be useful if you want to self-publish your training unit this term.


 

Week 3 Train

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Chapter 6

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Objectives
 
1. Recall the strengths and weaknesses of the lecture, experimental activity, and facilitated group discussion training method.
2. Explain the concepts of relevance, organization, schema, redundancy, immediacy, and engagement and demonstrate how you would develop and present a lecture/discussion using each.
3. Compare and contrast case studies, simulations, role-plays and demonstrations.
4. Describe what occurs in each stage of planning, preparing, presenting, and unpacking an activity.
5. List and explain the four steps of the unpacking process including Experience, Description, Inference, and Transference.
6. List prompts or probing questions that will help trainees unpack the Description, Inference, and Transference stages of the E*D*I*T process.
7. Provide examples of leading, factual, direct, general, controversial, provocative, re­direct, yes/no, and why/how questions.
8. Describe what happens in the stages of facilitating a group discussion including
presenting stimulus, providing ground rules, and facilitating group interaction.
9. Demonstrate how the threaded and round robin techniques are used when facilitating a
group discussion.
10. Recall and explain the significance of the four questions a trainer must answer in order to determine which training method is most appropriate.
 

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Chapter Overview
 
This chapter reviews the popular categories of training methods (lecturing, conducting experiential activities, and facilitating group discussions) and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using each method.
 

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Chapter Lecture
 
I. Training methods are procedures used to present information and demonstrate behaviors you want trainees to learn.
A. Lecturing uses verbal messages to impart large amounts of prepared information using one way communication.
1. Advantages
a. Allows you to cover a lot of material in a short amount of time.
b. Gives you command of what happens in the classroom.
c. Flexible for different size groups.
2. Disadvantages
a. Can be trainer centered rather than trainee centered
b. Can fail to engage trainees in the learning process
c. Can be boring for trainees.
B. Lecture/Discussion conveys a lot of new and prepared information in a short amount of time and is perceived as being interactive.
1. Make lecture content relevant.
2. Organize lecture content by chunking information into manageable and meaningful units.
3. Develop or provide a schema to help trainees organize information.
4. Build in redundancy by repeating and reiterating information.
a. Highlight important information by using feedforward messages.
5. Use an immediate style of delivery
a. Use people’s names
b. Be nonverbally responsive
c. Use appropriate self disclosure.
6. Use engagement strategies to encourage trainees to reflect on or interact with the information they are receiving.
a. Stimulus prompts are partial statements or questions that trainees can complete.
b. Rhetorical questions allow trainees to reflect on their lives and work experience.
c. Personal thought inventories (PTI) engage trainees and get feedback for the trainer.
d. Journal, Lecture, Diagnose, Recommend
C. Experiential activities require trainees to involve themselves physically or psychologically with the training content.
1. Case studies use hypothetical problems to apply the training content.
2. Simulations use role-play or enactments to resolve a communication related problem.
3. Project based learning (PBL) uses actual work based problems.
4. Role-plays allow trainees to act out a particular part they have developed.
5. Demonstrations allow trainees to show the class how a particular behavior
can be used and applied.
D. Advantages of conducting experiential activities
1. Engages trainees.
2. Increases trainees self confidence.
3. Helps trainees transfer training content.
E. Disadvantages of conducting experiential activities
1. Underdeveloped activities may lack clear direction or run out of time.
2. Activities may not be unpacked so trainees understand the value and relevance of the activity.
3. Artificial
4. Trainees can perceive them as threatening.

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II. There are five stages to conducting experiential activities.
A. Planning to make your learning objectives be observable, measurable, attainable, and specific.
B. Preparing by brainstorming possible activities.
1. Develop a clear set of instructions.
2. Gather all instruction materials.
C. Presenting the information.
1. Write out all instructions step by step and provide all trainees with a copy.
2. Ask trainees to paraphrase instructions to ensure understanding.
3. Provide time guidelines
4. Manage the activity by monitoring the trainees.
D. Unpacking asks trainees to make sense out of the experience.
1. Allow 25% of total activity time to unpack.
2. Use E*D*I*T to have a guided discussion
a. Experience the activity.
b. Describe the experience.
c. Infer what trainees have learned from the activity.
d. Transfer experiences and new knowledge and behaviors to trainees’ personal and professional lives.
E. Assess if you reached your learning objectives.


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III. Facilitating Group Discussion allows the trainer to guide the discussion of three to ten trainees toward specific learning objectives.
A. Ask probing questions.
1. Ensure all group members participate equally
2. Bring out difference so opinion.
3. Note areas of agreement and disagreement
4. Provide internal summaries
B. Advantages
1. Involves all trainees.
2. Allows trainees to learn from others’ experiences, attitudes, beliefs, and values.
3. Perceived to be a safe environment.
4. Appropriate for learning objectives that focus on the affective dimension of learning.
C. Problems that can arise due to unskilled facilitators
1. Ability to keep the discussion focused on learning objectives.
2. Not having equal participation of all group members.
3. Inability to manage group members’ emotions.


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IV. Facilitating group discussions begins with a learning objective.
A. Stimulus is used to provoke a reaction from trainees.
1. Trigger questions deal with claims of value, policy, or process.
2. Review the questions with trainees to ensure understanding.
3. Ask trainees to interact and reflect on stimulus.
4. Trainees journal responses to trigger questions.
B. Create a safe environment by setting ground rules and be sure they are followed.
C. Facilitate group discussion by asking additional questions and redirecting conversation to meet your learning objectives.
1. Monitor nonverbal communication behaviors to pull out those who may disagree.
2. Encourage reticent speakers.
3. Carefully shut down those who are too willing to communicate.
4. Provide a final summary.

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V. Use Bloom’s taxonomy to help formulate questions based on levels of learning.
A. Open questions that are more ambiguous and don’t have a single correct or incorrect
response (higher level cognitive learning) tap into higher forms of cognitive learning.
1. Evaluation is determining the value of something based on learned criteria.
2. Synthesis is creating something new based on information and principles
learned.
3. Analysis is breaking information learned into separate parts.
B. Closed questions that require the recall of specific information (lower order cognitive learning) may inhibit trainees’ responses unless they know the correct answer.
1. Application is using information learned to solve a problem or relate information learned to a new context.
2. Comprehension is summarizing information in a way other than how it was originally learned to confirm the information was understood.
3. Knowledge is recalling information as it was learned.
C. Questions can be used to tap into the broad spectrum of Bloom’s taxonomy.
1. Leading questions suggest the answer.
2. Factual questions seek facts, data, information.
3. Direct questions are directed at a specific person.
4. General questions are directed at the entire group.
5. Controversial questions have two or more answers.
6. Provocative questions are used to incite an answer.
7. Re-directed questions are directed at the facilitator but returned to the group.
8. Yes and no questions call for a yes or no response.
9. Why and how questions probe for additional responses following yes or no responses.

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D. Facilitation techniques help discussions flow more smoothly.
1. Suggestions for asking questions.
a. Allow ample wait time after asking a question.
b. Don’t answer your own questions.
c. Probe for additional information when appropriate.
d. Accept and dignify responses.
2. Use threaded discussions
a. Ask an open question.
b. Integrate the response into your next question.
c. Pose the question to the same person or another group member.
3. Use Round Robin techniques
a. Ask a question.
b. Ask each group member in turn for a response. E. Use a computerized channel to facilitate discussion. D. Selecting the best training method considers several variables.
1. Your trainees
2. Your learning objectives.
3. Advantages and disadvantages of each method.
4. Your level of comfort.
 



 

Chapter 7

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Chapter 7 Objectives
 
1. List and explain the four purposes of using presentational aids.
2. Discuss and implement five strategies of using presentational aids.
3. List and describe two advantages of two disadvantages for using the following types of presentational aids: handouts, posters and flipcharts, dry erase boards, overhead projectors, and the Internet.
4. Discuss two advantages and two disadvantages regarding the use of the Internet in presentational aids.
5. Describe three strategies for designing and delivering computers to generate presentational aids.
 

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Chapter Overview
 
This chapter looks at using presentational aids and technology in training by focusing on why presentational aids should be used, the basic principles for their uses, and suggestions for using different types of aids.
 

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Chapter Lecture
 
I. Presentational aids can be used to influence how people attend and respond to the message.
A. Promote interest and capture attention.
B. Illustrate and clarify complex concepts.
C. Demonstrate a principle or action.
D. Enhance retention by helping trainees remember information once the training is
over.
E. Motivate trainees to change ineffective behaviors.
F. Provide a context for the skills they are learning.


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II. Presentation aids can be used successfully by following some fundamental principles.
A. Keep it simple by relating it to a training objective.
1. Use key words or bullet points.
2. Use the appropriate fonts for printed or electronic materials.
B. Talk with trainees and not your presentational aids.
1. Maintain eye contact with trainees.
2. Arrange presentational aids in the appropriate order for your presentation.
3. Make sure all equipment is fully functioning and focused.
4. Establish rapport with trainees before using presentational aids.
C. Make presentational aids large enough to be seen easily by those on the last row.
1. Confirm the number of trainees.
2. Confirm the size and shape of your training classroom.
3. Have handouts available and ready to distribute if needed.
D. Be ready to present without presentation aids if problems arise.
1. Don’t make your presentation dependent on presentational aids.
2. Carry the original copy of the presentational aids with you.
3. Anticipate problems or failure of technology.
E. Practice with your presentational aids prior to training.
1. Get the feel of the classroom.
2. Ensure the ease of using the equipment.
3. Ensure the ease of smooth transitions.

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II. Using presentational aids.
A. Handouts are documents you design, copy, and distribute to your trainees.
1. Make sure handouts are free of errors.
2. Distributing handouts while you are speaking is distracting for everyone.
3. Instruct trainees when to view handouts.
4. Consider the advantages and disadvantages.
B. Posters and flipcharts
1. Use with small groups and in small rooms.
2. Write large enough for all to see.
3. Use display and hide techniques to cover material until you are ready to use it.
4. Place the tripod and flipchart in the corner of the classroom.
5. Use quality materials.
6. Practice so presentational aids can be used with ease and comfort.
7. Consider the advantages and disadvantages.
C. Dry erase boards (white boards) are panels that allow trainers to use markers.
1. Use appropriate markers and erasers.
2. Bring your own dry erase markers and erasers.
3. Use markers correctly.
4. Consider advantages and disadvantages.
D. Overhead projectors use transparencies to project large images onto a screen.
1. Place the projector in the appropriate place.
2. Turn the projector off when not in use.
3. Take spare overhead projector lamps with you to the training classroom.
4. Bring an extension cord.
5. Use color when possible.
6. Consider the advantages and disadvantages.
E. Videotape and DVD
1. Use brief clips and excerpts
2. Provide guiding questions.
3. Cue your clip.
4. Provide instructions or context.
5. Consider the advantages and disadvantages.

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III. Designing your computer generated presentation
A. Don’t clutter images by having more than one or two design features.
B. Balance images for symmetry.
C. Use minimal animation and transitions.
D. Use sound effect strategically.
E. Use preprogrammed color schemes and formats.
F. Avoid design shock from garish colors, poor contrast, or limited visibility.
G. Strive for uniformity and consistency.
H. Regulate and coordinate the number of visuals so you present one to two slides per minute.

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IV. Delivering your computer generated presentation
A. Plan for early set up and testing of the equipment.
B. Control the lighting in the training classroom to control ambient light.
C. Turn off the screen saver on the presentation computer.
D. Prepare handouts in case there is a technical problem or to provide a schema for taking notes.
E. Develop a contingency plan in the event you are unable to use the computer.
F. Prepare a closing to the training presentation.

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V. Using the internet as a presentation aid.
A. Advantages
1. Websites can be projected on the screen for the entire group.
2. Provides real time or live information.
3. Allow individual trainees to visit preselected websites relevant to the training content.
4. Can make us of simulations, threaded discussions, or group interactions that provide hands on experience.
B. Considerations
1. Visit the websites beforehand
2. Set up internet connections prior to presentation.
3. Consider the speed of you r internet connection.
4. Consider the possibility of high internet traffic that might slow you presentation.
5. Be prepared to work without the internet if the system is down.

 

Let's Talk Turkey

Wild Turkey Males Displaying, Texas, USA Photographic Print by Rolf Nussbaumer

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CONTENT AREA TEST

You cannot teach or train people if you don't know the content or ideas you are trying to convey. This week, please take the test over the content area you plan to teach. While you are taking the test, think about these questions and answer them through a substantive reflective post in the discussion board. Post a substantive, reflective essay (minimum 250 words) in which you analyze the test you take and describe how you will prepare effective assessment for this content area.

 

1. Describe one or more questions you found difficult or confusing. Explain how you would improve the question.

 

2. Objective style questions take longer to prepare, but less time to grade. Essay questions are easy to write, but need a rubric for effective grading. Discuss how you could improve the test through using both types of questions.

 

3. Probably the most common system for writing questions uses Bloom's Taxonomy.

The idea is to assessment on the application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation levels. How can you do that when you assess student or employee work? If you teach for Park University, you will have to use this system in assessing your core assessment.

Here are some links about Bloom's Taxonomy:

http://honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/committees/FacDevCom/guidebk/teachtip/questype.htm

http://www.dbu.edu/faculty/bloompage.html

 

CHEATING

4. How will you be proactive to prevent cheating on a test or assignment?

a. Tell students "Don't cheat. Keep your eyes on your own paper."

b. Allow students to bring one 3x5 notecard with anything they want on the card. By creating the "crib sheet" they will learn information, and they will have enough to jog their memories.

c. Allow students to work in teams or pairs.

d. Take a segment of a paper and run it through Google. Many schools have software that contains all published works and all papers submitted to the system.

e.  Look at students during a test instead of reading a book or doing something else.

f.  Use multiple forms of test.  With a word processor, it's easy to mix up the order of the exam.

g.  Keep your tests at home or locked up and shred old copies.  One of my tests was for sale.  About a week before finals, a bunch of students used a garbage truck to pick up garbage by academic buildings, then looked through for thrown away pages from tests.  They reconstructed dozens of tests and put them up for sale.  I've had colleagues who had their office broken into through the duct work so that tests were stolen.

 

5.  If you suspect someone of cheating, what will you do?

Do NOT accuse them in front of anyone because you can be sued.

 

 

Learning Activities for Chapter 6

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1. Running an experiential activity
 
Use the E*D*I*T process to run an experiential activity.
 

Listening and Paraphrasing Exercise1 Instructions to participants:
 
Your task is to discuss in a face-to-face situation any of the topics listed below. You must follow these rules:
1. Before each person can speak, he or she must summarize in his or her own words what the previous member covered in their discussion. The previous member must agree that the summary has captured the content and emotion of the message.
2. If the summary is incomplete or incorrect, the original speaker will correct and repeat the original portion of the discussion and the listening member should paraphrase again.
3. If the new summary is complete, the partners will trade roles: the previous speaker will become the listener and the listener will become the speaker.
 
Possible topics:
Describe the experience of being in love.
Describe where you would go on a perfect vacation if money were no object. Describe the perfect living environment.
Describe one of your scary dreams.
Describe an experience that made you very proud of an accomplishment. Discuss your feelings about being organized or disorganized.
 
Now use the E*D*I*T process.


 

Learning Activities for Chapter 7

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1. Evaluating and designing computer generated slides.
 
Chapter 7 offers several examples of slides that are too complicated and/or are difficult to read. Critique these slides and discuss or re-produce them so they are more appropriate.
 

2. Developing content to support training objectives.
 
Discuss the type(s) of presentational aids you may use in your upcoming training and design a handout, poster, overhead or computer generated slide in support of their topic.
 

3. Choosing the appropriate visual aid
 
Discuss the advantages, disadvantages, and appropriate use of the following types of visual aids:
 
· Handouts
· Flip Charts
· Overhead Slides
· Videos
· Internet
 

4. Being prepared
 
Think of the visuals you may use in your upcoming presentations. Prepare a checklist of items to bring, things to check beforehand, and a back up plan in case of problems.
 

Week 4 Present

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Chapter 8

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Objectives
1. Describe the key purposes of a training plan.
2. Identify and perform the key steps in writing a training plan.
3. Develop and use three different types of training plan formats.
4. Write a training plan using four practical training planning tips.
5. Identify, describe, and implement three models of testing the quality of a training plan.


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Chapter Overview
This chapter discusses how to prepare the written training plan containing (1) the objectives, (2) a description of the training content, (3) a description of the training methods, and (4) a detailed description of presentation aids and resources.


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Chapter Lecture
I. A training plan is a written description of a training session.
A. Connects what the trainees need to learn (needs assessment) with the training objectives.
B. Connects the training objectives with training methods.
II. Preparing to write a training plan
A. Conduct research to find the most up to date information for your training presentation.
B. Develop training content.
1. Identify key action steps or skills that trainees need to master.
2. Focus your research using your training objectives.
C. Determine training time frames.
1. Typical time frames range from two hours to full day sessions.
2. Training modules are specific blocks of training that focus on a particular skill or concept for one to two hours without a break.


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III. Determine training methods by considering the amount of time and the size of your audience.
A. Adult learners prefer to be actively involved in solving problems that affect them.
B. Choose interactive activities appropriate for the number of trainees.
IV. Select training materials
A. Consider audiovisual needs.
B. The participant’s guide will contain all handouts and other information needed during training.

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V. Drafting your training plan
A. Elements include training objectives, training content, time needed for each activity, training methods to be used, and materials needed.
B. Formats
1. The descriptive format presents the information using a narrative style using subheadings and paragraphs to describe each training element.
2. The outline format organizes content using an annotated outline.
3. Multicolumn training plan format utilizes columns for time, content,
method and materials.


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VI. The Participant’s Guide contains handouts, work information, worksheets and activity
instructions from the workshop.
A. Draft content that relates to each learning objective.
B. Include a table of contents.
C. Include a brief list of information or skill steps.
D. Include page numbers.
E. Include bibliographical citations.

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VII. Practical training planning tips
A. Draft participant’s guide first.
B. Plan for a change of method or activity every 20 minutes.
C. Build in the skill training sequence of tell, show, invite, encourage, correct.
D. Plan for contingencies for slowing down or speeding up the training session.
E. Revise, revamp, and reconstruct the training prior to presentation.
F. Test the effectiveness of your plan.
1. Use a focus group to get feedback.
2. Conduct a pilot test or trial run.
G. Invite a subject matter expert to review the training material.
 


 

Chapter 9

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Chapter 9 Objectives
 
1. Deliver a training session that considers the physical and psychological needs of the trainees.
2. Identify and analyze and appropriately use environmental factors to enhance the training sessions.
3. Describe four characteristics of seating arrangements as they relate to training delivery and response.
4. Describe and use nonverbal techniques that promote nonverbal immediacy during a training session.
5. Describe and make language choices that promote verbal immediacy during a training session.
 

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Chapter Overview
 
This chapter offers a discussion of perspectives, skills, and rationale for effective delivery. It includes suggestions on how to plan for the delivery of a training presentation that enhances trainer credibility and facilitates learning.
 

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Chapter Lecture
 
I. Planning the delivery of your training session
A. Consider your trainees
1. Consider the physiological needs such as access to food and water.
2. Vary training methods to allow for an attention span of about 20 minutes.
3. Adopt an extemporaneous approach that allows you the flexibility to adapt to
your audience.
B. Consider your physical training environment
1. Where the training will take place.
2. Access to services and facilities.
3. Other activities taking place in the same building.
4. Room temperature, lighting, and audiovisual controls.
5. Seating arrangements determine the amount of interaction you’ll receive during training.
a. Choose row and column for lecture.
b. Choose horseshoe or circle for interaction and discussion.
6. Consider your position in relation to your audience and your use of visual aids.
7. Potential sources for distraction could come from rules, regulations, activities, or events.
8. Ask trainees to turn off cell phones.
C. Consider your psychological training environment
1. Assess the organizational culture to identify norms, rules, policies, practices, values, history and organizational characteristics.
2. Assess the mindset of your trainees.


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II. Establishing nonverbal immediacy when delivering training
A. Immediacy is the degree of physical or psychological closeness between people (Me Arabian).
B. Instructors who are perceived as immediate enhance student learning, motivation, and ratings of instruction.
C. Verbal immediacy includes the way you use words to convey a sense of interest and involvement with others.
D. Nonverbal immediacy focuses on the unspoken aspects of how you present yourself.
1. Nonverbal communication is more loaded with emotion than verbal communication.
2. Nonverbal communication is more believable than verbal.
3. If there is a discrepancy between the verbal and nonverbal message, trainees will almost always believe the nonverbal.

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III. Nonverbal channels can be used to promote immediacy
A. Your personal appearance affects how your audience will respond to you and your message.
1. Strive for a professional but approachable look.
2. Dress at the same level or slightly more formal than your trainees.
3. Your grooming and attire should be crisp, clean, and professional.
B. Positive, concerned, and sincere facial expressions produce more immediacy.
C. Make sure all trainees receive eye contact during the training.
1. Use an eye scan to start at one side of the room and sweep inclusively to the other side.
2. Use a spot scan to systematically look at specific zones in the room.
3. Garner depth of eye contact to ensure personal visual contact with trainees.
D. Use appropriate gestures and movement.
1. Repeating uses gestures to repeat what you are saying.
2. Make sure your verbal gestures do not contradict with your nonverbal gestures.
3. Substitutions take the place of verbal messages.
4. Complementing uses gestures to add emphasis to your spoken message.
5. Emphasizing can underscore an important point.
6. Regulating gestures and nonverbals can help regulate the interaction between you and your trainees.
7. Movement should be consistent with the verbal content and not distracting.
8. Posture should convey poise, confidence, and professionalism.
E. Monitor adaptors of both you and your audience.
F. Be aware of appropriate use of space
1. Use social and public zones when presenting information during training.
2. Consider appropriate use of social or personal space during breaks.
G. Vocal cues can convey emotions and interest in a topic.

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IV. Establishing verbal immediacy during the training
A. Use personal pronouns that reference you and your trainees as a team.
B. Actively involve trainees in discussion.
C. Use personal examples.
D. Address trainees by their first names.
E. Ask questions and inquire about feelings about the requests and assignments.
V. Strategies for evaluating and improving your training delivery
A. Identify your strengths and weaknesses by viewing a videotape of your training.
B. Pay careful attention to trainee responses on evaluation forms.
C. Evaluate your credibility.
1. Be confident.
2. Be well marinated in your material.
3. Be authentic.
4. Be responsive to trainee comments and needs.
5. Be polished in your delivery.
6. Be open to new perspectives.
7. Be professional.
8. Be prepared.
9. Be on time.
10. Be relevant.
 

 

Let's Talk Turkey

Wild Turkey Art Print by John James Audubon

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WHAT IS YOUR PHILOSOPHY OF TEACHING?

 

Write a 250-750 word essay, which you post online in the appropriate discussion board. In addition, read the posts and respond with substance to the ideas of four other students.

Save this essay for your teaching/training portfolio you submit to Park University or a potential employer.

 

CONSTRUCTIVIST TEACHING

 

Research has suggested that constructivist teaching may be particularly effective. See how the constructivist approach fits with your philosophy.

 

1. How might students entry points be identified?

Constructivist teachers seek and value students' points of view. Knowing what students think about concepts helps teachers formulate classroom lessons and differentiate instruction on the basis of students' needs and interests.

 

2. What is involved in structuring the experiences that will build bridges from present understanding to new understanding?

Constructivist teachers structure lessons to challenge students' suppositions. All students, weather they are 6 or 60, come to the classroom with life experiences that shape their views about how their world works. When educators permit students to construct knowledge that challenges their current suppositions, learning occurs. Only through asking students what they think they know, and why they think they know it, are the teachers and the students able to confront their suppositions.

 

3. How might the selection of projects pose questions that relate to students' real-life experiences?

Constructivist teachers recognize that students must attach relevance to the curriculum. As students see relevance in their daily activities, their interest in learning grows.

 

4. What are the major concepts that students should understand?

Constructivist teachers structure lessons around big ideas, not small bits of information. Exposing students to wholes first helps them determine the relevant parts as they refine their understanding of the wholes. (Top-Down teaching strategy)

 

5. How might we move from right/wrong to monitoring students' understanding?

Constructivist teachers assess student learning in the context of daily classroom investigations, not as separate events. Students demonstrate their knowledge every day in a variety of ways. Defining understanding as only that which is capable of being measured by paper-and-pencil assessments administrated under strict security perpetuates false and counterproductive myths about academia, intelligence, creativity, accountability, and knowledge. http://online.sfsu.edu/

 

The constructivist theory of learning has, again, come to the forefront. Constructivism isn't new; John Dewey advocated it at the turn of the century. Jean Piaget developed the theory based on his view of psychological development of Children, as did Jerome Bruner, and Vygotsky with the social constructivism.

 

Constructivism is student-centered; it proposes that learning environments should support multiple perspectives or interpretations of reality, knowledge construction, context-rich, experience-based activities. Constructivism focuses on knowledge construction, not knowledge reproduction. It is a belief that one constructs knowledge from one's experiences, mental structures, and beliefs that are used to interpret objects and events. The mind is instrumental and essential in interpreting events, objects, and perspectives on the base that is personal and individualistic. Our view of the external world differs from others because of our unique set of experiences.

 

"We don't describe the world we see;
we see the world we can describe."

 

An important component of constructivist theory is to focus a student's education on authentic tasks. These are tasks which have real-world relevance and utility, that integrate those tasks across the curriculum, that provide appropriate levels of difficulty or involvement. It would be impossible for us all to become masters of all content areas, so instruction is anchored in some meaningful, real-world context .

According to constructivist theory, Children learn whole to part, not incrementally. The ideas and interests of Children drive the learning process. Teachers are flexible; sometimes they are the giver of knowledge, but often are the facilitator. Dwyer (1991) asserts that this approach is student centered rather than curriculum centered, while Bagley and Hunter (1992) state that learning becomes a dynamic process. Bagley and Hunter (1992) go on to say that active learning leads to greater retention and higher level thinking. And as knowledge continues to double every two years, and since it also has a shelf life, students must learn to access information; there is now far too much information to memorize. Source: http://online.sfsu.edu/

 

Five Guiding Principles of Constructivism:

1. Pose problems of emerging relevance to students.

. Structure learning around primary concepts.

3. Seek and value students' points of view.

4. Adapt instruction to address student suppositions.

5. Assess student learning in the context of teaching. Source: http://www.thirteen.org/

 

EXAMPLE TEACHING PHILOSOPHY (Written by Dr. Aitken)

 

During a series of evaluations of my teaching, the three words my students most frequently used to describe my courses were “interesting, fun, and challenging.” I am enthusiastic about the fascinating content of the field of communication. I enjoy guiding students to attach meaning in their educational process. I set high standards and challenge students to think about and approach communication in new ways. I believe in the importance of all communication contexts, including writing and speaking. In my classroom, I expect the following.

 

FIND EXCELLENCE

First, I believe in demonstrating quality in learning. This means that I encourage all students to revise their work to achieve the highest expectations (90% mastery level) through mastery learning. Turn in your core assessment 3/4 of the way through the course so you can receive my feedback and have time to revise for higher quality.

 

USE FEEDBACK FOR CHANGE

Second, I tend to be pragmatic and results oriented. If you have questions about why we have learning objectives or outcomes and what they are supposed to accomplish, please ask.

 

USE RESEARCH-BASED INFORMATION

Finally, I expect students to focus on scholarly, research-based information as our best chance of finding truth. The American Psychological Association Publication Manual (APA) is the style manual for this course.

 

Further, I seek to use research-based scholarship, such as the principles of good practice advocated by Chickering and Gamson (1987):

 

 

Responsibility 1: The instructor respects diverse talents and ways of learning. I prepare the course designed for maximum student learning. I am open to students at all learning levels, who come from a variety of educational, ethnic, and cultural frameworks.

 

Responsibility 2: I encourage student-faculty contact and interaction. If you have any concerns or questions, please see me in my office (229 Copley) or give me a call (816-584-6785). If you call the office and don't reach me, feel free to call me at home any day before 8 PM.

Responsibility 3: I encourage student cooperation. I seek to provide a collaborative and supportive learning community.

Responsibility 4: I encourage active learning.


Responsibility 5: I give prompt feedback.

Responsibility 6: I emphasize time on task.


Principle 7: I have high expectations for students and myself.

 

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 39(7), 3-7.

 

Learning Activities for Chapter 8

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1. Practicing components
 
Discuss your project planning regarding the following.
Set induction
Facilitated discussion
Experiential activity
Use of visual aids

 

Learning Activities for Chapter 9

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1. Credibility and initial impressions

Discuss the importance of initial impressions on trainees and the strategies for making a good first impression in training and consulting contexts.

2. Verbal and nonverbal immediacy
Give a practice training session to a coworker or record yourself on video and ask someone to give you feedback on this sheet.
Rating Verbal and Nonverbal Immediacy Behaviors
 
The trainer demonstrated the following verbal and nonverbal immediacy behaviors: Ratings from 1 - 3 are poor, 4 - 7 are average, and 8 - 10 are excellent.
 

Personal Appearance

1 2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Facial Expressions

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

1 2

3

Eye Contact

1 2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Appropriate gestures and movement

6

7

8

9

10

1 2

3

4

5

Adaptors

1 2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Use of space

1 2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

List the verbal immediacy strategies used by the trainer:

List the nonverbal immediate strategies used by the trainer:

 

Discuss the results in the online Discussion Board.

 

Week 5 Assess

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Grading

Untitled, 1983 Art Print by Keith Haring

 

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Probably no element is more crucial to student or trainee satisfaction than your grading policies. You will want to give serious thought to how you will grade or provide feedback.

 

If you are going to teach at Park University, you will need to provide a division of the percentage and points for the course assignments. To make it simple, you will have more accuracy by using fewer point. If you artificially expand the grade through a point system, then collapse it to A, B, C, D, F, you can introduce error by using a large number of points.

 

Read this information from Tools for Teaching by Barbara Gross Davis; Jossey-Bass Publishers: San Francisco, 1993. http://teaching.berkeley.edu/bgd/grading.html

 

Here are some grading systems to consider.

 

 

10 A+

9  A-

8  B-

7 C-

5 D-

5 A+

4 A

3 B

2 C

1

This system tends to lower grades because faculty are reluctant to give an A+.

POINT VALUES

There are 100 points possible in the course. 100% = 100 points. A typical way of approaching grading is to use percentages.
90-100 = A
80-89.99 = B
70-79.99 = C
60-69.99 = D
Below 60 = F

If you just use whole numbers, you will need to explain how you do rounding.

279-300             =          A

270-278             =          A-

261-269             =          B+

249-260             =          B

240-248             =          B-

231-239             =          C+

219-230             =          C

210-218             =          C-

201-209             =          D+

189-200             =          D

180-188             =          D-

179 and below               =          F

15A+

14 A

13 A-

12 B+

11 B

10 B-

9 C+

8 C

7 C-

6 D+

5 D

4 D-

3 F+

2 F

1 F-

Mastery Options:

Any grade under 80% should be revised.

Any grade under 90% can be revised.

Any grade can be revised.

If revised, the student can gain 1/2 of the missed points.

Your grade needs to convert to this kind of system in the end. This is NOT a percentage basis.

4 = A

3 = B

2 = C

1 = D

If using a percentage basis, then it looks like this based on a 4 point scale.

4 = A+

3.6 = 90% or A-

3.2 = 80% B-

2.8 = C-

2.4 = D-

 

 

How do you figure a percentage?

Multiply the percentage times the number of points.

.80 or 80% times 7 possible points is 5.7 points

If the test has 75 questions and the student received 67, divide 75 into 67 for the percentage. Always divide the smaller number by the larger number to obtain the percentage = 89%.

If the test is worth 12 points, then multiply .893 x 12 = 10.72 points. If you leave the fractions, the grading will be more accurate.

 

 

 

Students will understand your system better if the system is easy to understand.

 

Some additional sources worth reading.

 

Grading interpersonal communication http://eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/35/2a/e0.pdf

Grading speeches http://www.siue.edu/SPC/SPC_Portfolio/standards.html

Grading papers http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/html/icb.topic58474/GradingPapers.html

Grading groups http://www.evergreen.edu/washcenter/resources/acl/b5.html

 

Chapter 10

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Chapter 10 Objectives
 
1. Identify strategies to manage quiet, talkative, “big headed”, negative, and aggressive trainees.
2. Describe three conflict management styles and discuss how to select an appropriate style for managing conflicts during training sessions.
3. Use conflict management skills appropriately and effectively during a training session.
4. Reduce conflict during a training session by using appropriate affinity-seeking, nonverbal and verbal immediacy, and pro-social behavior alteration techniques.
5. Manage and eliminate trainer misbehaviors.
 

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Chapter Overview
 
This chapter discusses the management of conflict in training sessions by covering how to anticipate and minimize unproductive conflict during training, examining conflict management styles, identifying conflict management skills, and offering strategies to prevent or reduce conflict.
 

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Chapter Lecture
 
I. Interpersonal conflict occurs between two people and is the result of one person blocking the achievement or goals of at least one other person.
A. Consider the underlying interpersonal needs of trainees.
1. Inclusion
2. Affection
3. Control
B. Trainees expect trainers to reduce or manage distractions in the training environment.

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II. Anticipate problem trainees
A. Quiet trainees rarely talk and are often misperceived as lacking interest, being a slow
learner, being apathetic, or being aloof.
1. Avoid consistently calling on quiet trainees.
2. Avoid assigned seating to allow quiet trainees to find their comfort zone.
3. Avoid evaluating trainees based on how much they have participated in the training classroom.
B. Make communication a rewarding experience.
1. Avoid ambiguity, novelty, and evaluation.
2. Increase trainees control over their success.
3. Use the think, pair, share technique to ask trainees to answer questions individually and pair with another to share ideas prior to sharing with the entire group.


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C. Talkative trainees are compulsive communicators who like to hear themselves talk and dominate training classroom discussion.
1. Use regulatory statements to curb talk.
2. If necessary, discuss trainees’ dominant communication style using conflict management skills.
D. Bigheaded trainees are all proclaimed experts who have done and seen it all.
1. Meet their control, inclusion, and affection interpersonal needs.
2. Reduce your communication with them.
3. Move away from them physically.
4. Use their expertise but channel it so it is not disruptive.
E. Negative trainees find the fault in everything you and others do.
1. Make the training relevant to their needs.
2. Give trainees some options.
3. Manage negative trainees negative experiences.
F. Manage aggressive trainees who lack social skills and go on the attack by using conflict management skills.

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III. Using conflict management skills
A. Understand that individuals have different conflict styles.
1. Nonconfrontational style fails to manage the conflict by avoiding it or giving in to the other’s requests.
2. Confrontation style is a win-lose approach where one wins at the expense of others.
3. Cooperative style views conflict as a win-win: a set of problems to be solved rather than a competition.
B. Manage the emotions
1. Take time to cool off and collect your thoughts.
2. Select an appropriate time and place to address the conflict.
3. Remain nonverbally responsive, interested and open to them and their communication.
4. Plan the meeting, outlining your outline and goal for the conversation.
C. Describe behaviors rather than evaluate the person
1. Identify and describe the problematic behaviors.
2. Use “I” messages rather than “you” messages.
D. Paraphrase content and emotions
1. Ask the problem trainee to paraphrase the content of the conflict conversation.
2. Ask the problem trainees to paraphrase the emotional content of the conflict conversation.
E. Adapt communication accordingly based on the trainee’s understanding of the problem.

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IV. Relational power is granted to instructors by students who like and respect them.
A. Affinity seeking is the process by which individuals attempt to get others to like and feel positive about them.
1. Assume equality
2. Comfortable self
3. Conversational rule keeping
4. Dynamism
5. Elicit other’s disclosure
6. Facilitate enjoyment
7. Optimism
B. Trainees are more willing to do what is asked of them if they like the instructor

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V. Use immediacy behaviors
A. Nonverbal immediacy behaviors
B. Verbal immediacy behaviors

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VI. Use pro-social behavior alteration techniques
A. Behavior alteration techniques are communication strategies that control and direct student behavior.
1. Pro-social techniques are positive and grounded in constructive relationships.
a. Immediate reward from behavior
b. Reward from others
c. Self esteem
d. Responsibility to others
e. Normative rules
f. Altruism
g. Peer modeling
h. Positive trainer-trainer relationship
i. Trainer modeling
j. Expert trainer
k. Trainer feedback
2. Anti-social techniques are negative and grounded in destructive
relationships.
a. Punishment from others
b. Guilt
c. Negative trainer-trainee relationship
d. Legitimate higher authority
e. Debt

 

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VII. Eliminate trainer misbehaviors
A. Make sure the trainer is not the source of conflict.
B. Identify potential problem behaviors and seek assistance.
 

 

Chapter 11

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Chapter 11 Objectives
 
1. List and explain two reasons why assessment is important.
2. Develop a series of a Likert-type and semantic differential scale items that assess trainees’ affect or liking for their trainer, training content, and trained behavior.
3. Develop multiple-choice, matching, and essay items to access cognitive learning outcomes.
4. Differentiate between atomistic, analytic, and holistic or general impression levels of behavioral assessments.
5. Develop a behavioral assessment instrument for a communication behavior that includes
behavioral items, skill ranges, and skill criteria.
6. Explain the importance of inter-rater reliability.
7. Differentiate between pre-post test, pre-post test with control group, post-test only with
control group, and repeated measure designs.
8. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of pre-post test, pre-post test with control
group, post-test only with control group, and repeated measure designs.
9. Explain the importance of triangulation.
10. Explain he significance of the cost benefit ratio.
 

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Chapter Overview
 
This chapter reviews the importance of assessment, how to measure affective, cognitive, and behavioral learning outcomes, presents various assessment designs, and discusses how to interpret assessment information.
 

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Chapter Lecture
 
I. Training assessment is a systematic process of evaluating training programs to ensure that they meet the needs of the trainees and organization.
A. Develop learning objectives that describe the outcomes you want at the end of the training program.
B. Measure learning outcomes by using surveys and interviews.
C. Interpret the assessment data.
D. Use data to modify and improve your training program.


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II. The importance of the assessment process
A. Assessment allows trainers to demonstrate they make a difference by increasing profits and decreasing expenses.
B. Assessment allows trainers to get and use feedback from trainees to ensure they are meeting the learning objectives.

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III. Measuring cognitive learning outcomes: Did they learn it?
A. Multiple choice exam items challenges trainees to decipher between three to five possible choices to a particular question.
B. Multiples choice exam items are made up of two parts.
1. Stems are the incomplete statement.
2. Foils are the alternative choices following the stem.
3. The keyed response is the correct answer.
4. Distractors are incorrect answers.
C. Advantages
1. Inexpensive when compared to other assessment instruments.
2. Require minimal time to administer and score.
3. Flexible and easily adaptable and revised.
D. Disadvantages
1. Correct answer can be deciphered through process of elimination.
2. May assess test taking abilities rather than cognitive learning outcomes.
3. May require rote memorization rather than application.
E. Suggestions for writing multiple choice questions.
1. Avoid making the correct answer too obvious.
2. All foils should be similar in length, parallel in construction, and precise in expression.
3. Keyed responses should be evenly distributed throughout the letters and the test items.
4. Avoid negatively worded or double negative stems an/or foils.
5. Avoid grammatical cues that give the correct answer away.
6. Avoid using “all” or “none of the above” foils.


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F. Matching exam items asks trainees to connect or attach two words and/or phrases together.
1. Useful when assessing a lot of content or when space is limited.
2. Poorly written items allow students to select answer through process of elimination.
3. Suggestions for using matching items.
a. Make sure the two sets remain similar in terms of content.
b. List of stimuli should be no longer than eight items with the response 50% longer.
c. List of possible responses should include plausible answers.
G. Essay items are asked to generate the correct response by recalling, explaining or organizing information into the correct response.
1. Advantages
a. Eliminates the possibility of guessing and focusing on rote memorization.
b. Allows trainees to apply information directly to their personal and professional lives.
2. Disadvantages
a. Require more time to read and evaluate.
b. Quality of the answer may only be as good as the quality of the question.
3. Suggestions
a. Define the task presented in the essay question.
b. Focus the essay question.
c. Write clear and specific directions.
d. Allow ample time for trainees to answer all essay questions. H. Guidelines for writing and administering exams
1. Write exams that cover each aspect of the training program making sure exam items are proportionate to the amount of time invested in each training concept.
a. Group items by chapters or units.
b. Include a variety of items to assess all levels of cognitive learning.
c. Write items in a way that remains consistent with how the content was presented.
d. Pilot the exam by asking colleagues to take it before you administer it to trainees.
2. Administer the exam in the same environment where students learned the content.


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IV. Measuring affective learning: Did they like it?
A. Affect is the degree of liking, appreciation, respect, and/or value one has for something.
B. Measure affective learning using a survey or questionnaire to measure how the trainees like, value, respect the content, behaviors, you, and the likelihood they will use the skills they learned.
1. The Likert scale asks trainees to respond to a statement indicating their level of agreement or disagreement.
2. The semantic differential measures attitudes by asking people to choose between two opposite positions.


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V. Measuring behavioral learning: Can they do it?
A. Behaviors can be assessed at three different levels.
1. Atomistic assessment determines if the behaviors were performed.
2. Analytic assessment determines how well each of the individual behaviors was performed.
3. Holistic or general impression assessment measures the overall quality of the skill performance.
B. Determine who will be completing the behavioral assessment.
1. 360-survey method
2. Customers
3. “phantom” customers
C. Include the behavioral items, skill ranges, and skill criteria in assessment instrument.
1. Skill ratings are a series of numbers or a scale that indicates the level or quality of performance.
2. Skill criteria describe behaviors for each skill rating.
3. Instrument must be reliable to be useful.
a. Criteria allows team of assessors to have inter-rater reliability.
b. Problems come from unclear skill rating criteria and poor training of the assessment team.
D. Quantitative assessment design for measuring training objectives.
1. Pre/post test design is used to measure trainees before and after the training to see if there is a change in knowledge, attitudes, and/or behaviors.
2. Pre/Post test with control group design compares trainees who have completed the training with another similar group who has not been exposed to the training.
3. Post test only with control group design uses post tests to measure both the control group and the group completing the training.
4. Repeated measure design uses pre and post tests as well as other tests at various intervals throughout the training program to determine where changes in knowledge, attitudes, or values occur.
a. Allows for trainers to make informed decisions about programs that don’t negatively affect learning outcomes.
b. Repeating testing at a later date would determine the long term effect of the training.


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VI. Qualitative assessment design is used to describe learning outcomes.
A. Focus groups utilize informal, focused discussion following the training program to
identify patterns or themes in the discussion that reflect learning outcomes.
B. Standardized interviews with randomly selected trainees can be analyzed for patterns
or responses or themes.
C. Interpreting assessment information
1. Analyze assessment data against the learning objectives.
a. If objectives were met, refine the program for improved outcomes.
b. If objectives were not met, diagnose the weakness and limitations of the training.
D. Reporting Assessment data using the cost benefit ratio to determine return on investment in training.

 


 

Learning Activity

 

Let's Talk Turkey

Rear View of Male Wild Turkey Tail Feathers During Display, Texas, USA Photographic Print by Rolf Nussbaumer

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Although you may be able to effectively analyze student responses on an objective-style test, how will you evaluate papers, essays, reflections, group assignments, and other more subjective learning activities? The answer is a rubric!

Write a substantive reflective essay about using rubrics (minimum 250 words). Begin by examining the Park University information on rubric assessment. https://www.park.edu/assessment/car.html End by creating a simple rubric of your own.

Here is the rubric I use for credit on the "Let's Talk Turkey" assignment. Now that you have been writing the assignment for weeks, how do you feel about just now finding out the grading criteria? How often have you taken an essay test and not know the grading criteria? What is the advantage of knowing the rubric in advance?

Let's Talk Turkey Grading Rubric

Expectation

Mastery of Expectation (Yes or No)

1. Shows thought and reflection about the topic to be discussed.

 

2. Content shows knowledge or perception based on readings or linked information for this course.

 

3. Demonstrates application, synthesis, or evaluation related to the concept, such as regarding how the student will apply this idea in the future.

 

 

Park University's CETL http://www.park.edu/cetl/assessmenteducation.aspx

 

KU Sample Rubrics http://www.kutztown.edu/admin/assessment/samprubric.asp

FROM MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY:

A rubric is a scoring tool that specifies the criteria for an assignment and the characteristics expected for several levels of quality. Rubrics inform students of the criteria used to evaluate their work and make grading both faster and more consistent. This page contains links to sites that provide resources for designing effective rubrics and examples.

"Scoring Rubrics: What, When and How?" Barbara M. Moskal (Colorado School of Mines). From the online journal Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation, Vol. 7, No. 3, 2000.
This article is an introduction to rubrics for scoring student work. It includes descriptions of different types of scoring rubrics and ways of developing rubrics.
http://pareonline.net/getvn.asp?v=7&n=3

RubiStar.
This site contains an online tutorial and templates for creating rubrics for a wide variety of learning activities.
http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php

“Grading with Rubrics: Developing a Fair and Efficient Assessment Tool,” Deandra Little (University of Virginia Teaching Resource Center).
Directions for creating a grading rubric that is also a teaching tool.
http://trc.virginia.edu/Publications/Teaching_Concerns/Fall_2006/TC_Fall_2006_Little.htm

Links to Examples of Scoring Rubrics (California State University).
Contains links to 29 sites with examples of college-level rubrics for many disciplines.
http://www.calstate.edu/acadaff/sloa/links/rubrics.shtml

The Critical Thinking Rubric (Washington State University).
Contains criteria for assessing students' critical thinking on a paper addressing a problem-based issue.
http://wsuctproject.wsu.edu/ctr.htm

 

 

Learning Activity

 

Syllabus or Agenda Preparation

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A syllabus or agenda should reflect your teaching philosophy, management plan, and many details that require thinking.  Below are templates for three courses and some syllabus content from other faculty. 

 

Please look at a few syllabi in the Communication Arts department at Park and discuss what you find.

Note how courses are linked to department goals. http://www.park.edu/syllabus/list.aspx

Undergraduate program goals in Communication Arts http://www.park.edu/communication/goals.html

Graduate program goals in Communication and Leadership http://www.park.edu/grad/masters-cl-goals.aspx

 

Learning Activities for Chapter 10

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1. Interview about Training

 

Interview a friend or colleague about a training session they have attended. Ask for details about what worked and didn't work. Draw some conclusions and discuss those in the online Discussion Board.

 

2. List of Training Experiences

 

Make a list of things you liked and things you didn't like about training you received. What lessons are there for you in preparing your unit?

 

Learning Activities for Chapter 11

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1. Evaluating test questions
Prepare (or borrow) a few multiple choice or essay questions you can use in your training unit. Share them and discuss how effective they are.
 

2. When to use assessments
Discuss the concept of evaluation as an ongoing process rather than something that happens at the end of training. Discuss how assessment could be used:
During the training session
At the end of the session
A few months or weeks after the training session.
Who might be involved in these evaluations?

 

 

Week 6 Lecture

 

No new readings or lecture this week. You have enough preparing the core assessment for Sunday.

 

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Week 7 Consult


 

Plan or Publication to Replace Content Final Exam  If you are preparing a training unit you want to sell or publish, you may want to do the following.  You can complete this assignment instead of completing the final exam.  You can prepare the materials in an electronic file, but you may also want to publish them in hardcopy.  Take a promotional photo of yourself with the materials, which you can use to sell your unit or yourself.  There is considerable flexibility in how you execute this assignment.
 


1. Cover letter (may be a cover letter for your teaching application or recruitment information for an employee workshop).
2. Instructional Unit or Workshop title

3. Syllabus for course or Agenda for employee workshop.  Think about what is missing in this course's syllabus and other courses you have taken.  How will you make sure you have covered all important aspects so your students understand what is coming and what you expect?
4. Workshop or unit description for promotional purposes (1-2 paragraphs)
5. Content outline
6. Behavioral objectives (revised from previous assignment)
7. Qualifications of Trainer (1-2 paragraphs). You may want to write a third-person perspective bio something like this. 

 

Dr. Joan E. Aitken will be the leader of the upcoming Leadership Measurement workshop.  Aitken has taught at four state universities and a private university.  Among her favorite courses in communication studies are research, interpersonal communication, organizational communication, public speaking, and public relations. . . .

 

Chapter 12

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Chapter 12 Objectives
 
1. Describe three trends in training and development and the implications for the training and development practitioner.
2. Differentiate teletraining from computer-mediated training be explaining the advantages and disadvantages of both.
3. List and describe the three different types of training jobs.
4. Differentiate training generalists from training specialists.
5. Differentiate the needs-assessment proposal from the training proposal.
6. Write and present a needs-assessment proposal making sure that it includes all of the
necessary sections: Briefing of Problem, Needs Assessment Procedures, Results, and
Conclusions.
7. Write and present a training proposal making sure that it contains all the necessary sections: Introduction of Trainer and Credentials, Title and Description of Training Program, Target Audience, Details of Training Program, Assessment of Learning Objectives, Training Budget, and Return on Investment Report.


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Chapter Overview
 
This chapter covers the current trends in training, discusses different types of career opportunities in training, and covers how to write and present training proposals.


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Chapter Lecture
 
I. Trends in training and development
A. Changes in the economy from an industrial society to an information society require more communication and relational skills.
B. Changes in technology require more training in computing and networking potential and effectiveness in mediated communication.
C. Changes in the workplace in adopting and using new technology require training in adapting to and methods for change.
D. Changes from face-to-face delivery to mediated forms of training.
 

1. Teletraining is training that is broadcast from a studio to others in distant
training locations using two way audio and video interactive technology.

a. Economical delivery when one trainer can reach a number of trainees
via television.
b. Training can be delivered to remote locations.
 

2. Teletraining has disadvantages that trainers must overcome in order to be successful.
a. Favors cognitive rather than behavioral or affective learning objectives.
b. Favors a trainer centered rather than a trainee centered approach.
c. Requires a different curriculum than is used in the traditional face to face classroom.
d. Doesn’t allow trainers to get trainees’ feedback.
 

3. Computer mediated training is delivered using the personal computer and the internet.
a. Economical to produce training via a CD-ROM or online.
b. Trainees can access computer mediated training when it accommodates their schedules.
c. Favors cognitive rather than behavioral or affective learning objectives.
d. Not all trainees are self motivated to complete a training program. II. Career opportunities in communication training and development.

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A. Getting a training job
1. Obtain a college education with a focus on courses on training.
2. Complete an internship in a training department to apply classroom learning to the workplace.
3. Join a professional training organization for an opportunity to network with professionals in the training field.
4. Focus less on getting a job in training than on finding a job in an organization that excites you.
5. Develop relationships with continuing education programs in order to meet people and try new training material and content.


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B. Types of training jobs
1. Needs analyst is responsible for conducting needs assessments.
2. Task analyst takes the skills identified by the needs analysis and breaks them down into a step-by-step outline.
3. Program designer translates needs into learning objectives, develops training
curricula, selects appropriate training methods, and develops lesson plans.
4. Media specialist works with the program designer in selecting and/or
designing audio and visual media to support the training.
5. Presenter delivers the training program.
6. Assessment specialist measures learning outcomes.
7. Training and development manger plans, organizes, staffs, controls, and bridges the training department with other organizational units.
8. Training and developments administrator ensures the facilities, equipment, materials, participants, and other components run smoothly.
9. Web based training specialist converts and organizes training curriculum for web based delivery.
a. Organization by topic categorizes by kinds of things.
b. Organization by procedures categorizes information by how it is done.
c. Organization by process categorizes information based on possible contingencies.
 

C. Effective web based training utilizes basic design principles.
a. Use a consistent and coherent layout style.
b. Use consistent and clear language,
c. Use emphasis techniques sparingly.
d. Use hyperlinks sparingly.
e. Use white space judiciously.
f. Use action statements throughout the website.
 

D. Training generalists perform all the jobs and tasks related to training.
 

E. Training specialists specialize in only one area.


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III. Writing and presenting proposals
A. The needs-assessment proposal explains the deficiency that can be solved through training.
1. Use the Introduction to introduce your self and establish your credibility.
2. The Briefing of the Problem describes the problem and explains its significance to the organization and to the organization’s bottom line.
3. The Needs-Assessment Procedure describes the sample, methodology, and data analysis used to identify the need.
4. The Results section clearly and concisely presents your findings.
5. The Conclusion confirms or disconfirms the problem and discusses possible causes and solutions.
6. Presentations may also be presented orally to key decision makers.
a. Provide a briefing summary.
b. Use visual aids to help the audience interpret your results.
c. Be prepared to answer questions.
d. Ask for approval in developing a training proposal.

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IV. Preparing a formal training proposal.
A. Introduction of trainer and credentials.
B. Title and description of the training program.
C. Target audience for the training.
D. Learning objectives for entire program and training modules.
E. Details of the training program.
F. Assessments of learning objectives.
G. Training budget that outlines all anticipated costs to develop, present, and assess training.
H. Return on Investment (ROI) report that examines the cost/benefit ratio of training.
 

V. Presenting training proposals
A. Present a job talk – a brief demonstration of one of the shorter training modules.
B. Ask for the training job.
 

 

Learning Activities

AllPosters.Com

 

1. Investigating training resources
 
At the end of this chapter, the authors offer several resources for trainers including books, web based information, and associations. Locate and evaluate one of these resources to evaluate the abundance of information available. How do other authors present their information? What additional methods are covered? How are these resources different when they do not address communication training topics?
 
2. Interview a training practitioner
 
Set up an interview with a training or human resource practitioner to discuss the scope of their job, how they acquired their job, challenges and opportunities, and current topics receiving attention.
 
3. Attend an ASTD meeting Kansas City ASTD - American Society of Training and Development
 
Locate a local chapter of ASTD and attend a meeting.



 

Week 8 Lecture

 

No new readings or lecture this week. You have enough with your reflection, project revisions, and the final exam (or self-publishing or applying to Park University to teach).

 

Congratulations on completing this course.

 

AllPosters.Com

 

Week 8 Let's Talk Turkey

 

Gaggle of Wild Turkeys, Lexington, Massachusetts Photographic Print by Tim Laman

AllPosters.Com

 

COURSE AND TEACHER EVALUATIONS

 

Write a substantive, reflective post about teacher and course evaluations.  Before you leave this course, make sure you complete the course evaluation.  While you are doing the evaluation, write down any thoughts you have about the evaluation as an effective measure.  You might want to think about online course evaluations posted by colleges and private websites.  Many faculty believe that dissatisfied students are more likely to complete evaluations than satisfied students. 

 

Research suggests that you can improve student evaluations--and be more likely to be retained in your job--by giving high grades and by giving a mid-term course evaluation.  What are the implications?

 

You can frame the mid-term evaluation to detect any problems, so you correct them before the end of the course.  You can also use the mid-term evaluation to dissipate potential problems by framing things in a positive way.  Here is an example midterm evaluation I've used.

 

NO NAME PLEASE. Please give me your honest feedback so I can adapt to the learning needs of this class, then place the form in an envelope. Thanks for your effort in this course! -Dr. Joan Aitken

 

Mid-term Course Feedback         Course: __________________________ Date: _____________

 

Three words that describe this course are

 

1.________________________ 2. ________________________ 3. ________________________.

 

 

In general, your professor. . .

True

False

1.

  • Respects student diversity and alternative points of view.

 

 

2.

  • Facilitates student learning.

 

 

3.

  • Actively engages students through activities.

 

 

4.

  • Uses a variety of teaching strategies to help students learn.

 

 

5.

  • Encourages faculty-student interaction, including being available outside class time.

 

 

6.

  • Provides a variety of learning strategies, such as handouts, rubrics, emails, webpages, eCompanion, or other learning support.

 

 

7.

  • Encourages student cooperation and teamwork.

 

 

8.

  • Gives prompt and useful feedback to students.

 

 

9.

  • Has high expectations of students.

 

 

10.

  • Uses class or work time productively.

 

 

11.

  • Has knowledge about the subject matter of the course.

 

 

12.

  • Provides a supportive and caring learning environment.

 

 

 

The thing I like most about this course is:

 

 

 

 

The thing I like most about this professor is:

 

 

 

 

A question I need answered is:

 

 

 

 

A course concept or idea I need clarified is:

 

 

 

 

For the last half of the course, I suggest:

 

 

 

Week 1 Discussion

Use the dropdown menu and "go" to access each thread. Your grade is based on participation in these ways.

1. Learning Activities (Required. Due Friday)

Complete multiple learning activities, then discuss them here.

2. Readings (Required. Due Sunday)

What is a fact from the unit materials that gained your attention?

3. Alternative Perspectives (By Sunday) Share the challenges of preparing and presenting your unit, insights, or other comments. Discuss the content you will teach. All opinions and points of view welcome!

4. Debate (By Sunday)

Is there something in the week's material that goes against your prior learning or experience? Discuss an alternative point of view. All opinions welcome here.

5. Interactive responses to other students in the class.

You have two weeks to post, then each discussion will be available for only one week.


"Every human being, of whatever origin, of whatever station, deserves respect. We must each respect others even as we respect ourselves." -- U. Thant

 

6. Program Goal for Teaching, Training, Consulting

Discuss how you have exchanged ideas about communication and leadership this week with other students.

Please prepare for class discussion IN ADVANCE by reading the assigned textbook and lecture materials.

http://vortis.com/blog/archives/2005/may/Prepare.jpg

Photo credit

 

Contact your professor if you have any questions. If you don't hear back promptly, please telephone or email again.

 

 

Please prepare for class discussion IN ADVANCE by reading the assigned textbook and lecture materials. Contact your professor if you have any questions. If you don't hear back promptly, please telephone or email again.

 

Week 2 Discussion

Use the dropdown menu and "go" to access each thread.

 

"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." -- Daniel Patrick Moynihan.

Threads:

1. Learning Activities (Required. Due Friday)

Complete multiple learning activities, then discuss them here.

2. Readings (Required. Due Sunday)

3. Share the challenges of preparing and presenting your unit.

4. Alternative Perspectives (By Sunday) Share the challenges of preparing and presenting your unit, insights, or other comments. Discuss the content you will teach. All opinions and points of view welcome!

5. Program Goal for Teaching, Training, Consulting

Consider your reading or research for this week. Discuss on concept you can use to resolve organizational issues and improve decision-making.

 

AllPosters.Com

 

Please prepare for class discussion IN ADVANCE by reading the assigned textbook and lecture materials. Contact your professor if you have any questions. If you don't hear back promptly, please telephone or email again.

 

Week 3 Discussion

Threads:

1. Learning Activities (Required. Due Friday)

Complete multiple learning activities, then discuss them here.

2. Readings (Required. Due Sunday)

3. Share the challenges of preparing and presenting your unit.

4. Alternative Perspectives (By Sunday) Share the challenges of preparing and presenting your unit, insights, or other comments. Discuss the content you will teach. All opinions and points of view welcome!

5. Program Goal for Teaching, Training, Consulting

Consider your reading or research for this week. Discuss on concept you can use to resolve organizational issues and improve decision-making.

AllPosters.Com

 

Please prepare for class discussion IN ADVANCE by reading the assigned textbook and lecture materials. Contact your professor if you have any questions. If you don't hear back promptly, please telephone or email again.

 

Week 4 Discussion

Threads:

1. Learning Activities (Required. Due Friday)

Complete multiple learning activities, then discuss them here.

2. Readings (Required. Due Sunday)

3. Presentation (Required. Due Sunday). Please discuss where you gave your presentation and what it was like.

4. Alternative Perspectives (By Sunday) All opinions and points of view welcome!

5. Program Goal for Teaching, Training, Consulting

Discuss how you have exchanged ideas about communication and leadership this week with organizational leaders.

6. What kinds of communication and leadership skills do you have that could translate into consulting?

 

AllPosters.Com

 

Please prepare for class discussion IN ADVANCE by reading the assigned textbook and lecture materials. Contact your professor if you have any questions. If you don't hear back promptly, please telephone or email again.

 

Week 5 Discussion

Threads:

1. Learning Activities (Required. Due Friday)

Complete multiple learning activities, then discuss them here.

2. Readings (Required. Due Sunday)

3. Share the challenges of preparing and presenting your unit.

4. Alternative Perspectives (By Sunday) All opinions and points of view welcome!

5. Program Goal for Teaching, Training, Consulting

6. Debate

Everyone with a last name from A-M, argue in favor of this position:

The responsibility for training is on the trainer.

Everyone with a last name from N-Z, argue in favor of this position:

The responsibility for training is on the trainee.

7. What kind of communication consulting would you enjoy doing?

 

AllPosters.Com

 

Please prepare for class discussion IN ADVANCE by reading the assigned textbook and lecture materials. Contact your professor if you have any questions. If you don't hear back promptly, please telephone or email again.

 

Week 6 Discussion

Thread:

1. How are you doing? Share the challenges of preparing and presenting your unit.

2. Alternative Perspectives (By Sunday) All opinions and points of view welcome! Program Goal for Teaching, Training, Consulting

3. What is a model of consulting you could use?

4. Consider your reading or research for this week. Discuss one element where ethical decisions can be involved. Explain the ethical choice you believe is right.

 

AllPosters.Com

 

Please prepare for class discussion IN ADVANCE by reading the assigned textbook and lecture materials. Contact your professor if you have any questions. If you don't hear back promptly, please contact again.

 

Week 7 Discussion

Extra credit only for people who missed an earlier week:

1. Learning Activities (Due Friday)

Complete multiple learning activities, then discuss them here.

2. Share the challenges of preparing and presenting your unit. (Due Sunday)

3. Alternative Perspectives (By Sunday) All opinions and points of view welcome!

 

Educational Consulting Links

Encompass http://www.encompass2learn.com/

Plato http://www.plato.com/About-Us/Careers.aspx

 

AllPosters.Com

 

Please prepare for class discussion IN ADVANCE by reading the assigned textbook and lecture materials.

 

Week 8 Discussion

Threads:

1. Reflection (Required. Due Friday)

2. Farewell

 

AllPosters.Com

 

 

Weblinks for Teaching, Training, Consulting

Internet links change often, so some links may not work. You can always use a search engine to find your own relevant links.

 

Course Environments

Blackboard

digital-seed

ecollege

elluminate

Firstclass

wimba

 

Assessment Help Software

Task Stream

 

Listservs for Educators Using Technology

ACTEMLIST

CSSSSEM-L

educause.edu

CRTNET Listserv (NCA)

NETPALS

 

Discussion Prompts about Technology

The History of YouTube (Kansas State Anthropology)

Did You Know; Shift Happens - Globalization; Information Age

 

YouTeach

http://code.google.com/p/youteach/

 

Create Your Own Wikis for Student Collaboration

http://wikimatrix.com/

http://pbwiki.com/

 

Teaching through Podcasting

http://www.bc.edu/offices/instruction/eteaching/initiatives/itunes_u.html

http://itunes.tc.columbia.edu/faqs.asp

http://teaching.iub.edu/podcast.php?nav=podcasts

http://t4.jordan.k12.ut.us/t4/content/category/6/68/58/

http://www.podcastforteachers.org/

http://www.speechworks.net/podcasts/Persuasion-JayHeinrichs.htm

 

Podcasting Resources

Americanpublicmedia.publicradio.org/podcasts/

AmericanManagementAssociation

http://www.sunlink.ucf.edu/

 

Computer Mediated Education Links

Built Environment Resources click here.

chico.rice

classroom.com

columbia

Computer Distance Education Resources click here.
Computer-Mediated Teaching click here.

Distance Education Links click here.
Distance Education Resources click here.
Distance Education Resources click here.
Distance Education Resources click here.
Distance Learning Reports And Abstracts click here.
Distance Teaching News, Resources, and Tools for Professionals click here.

Excellence in Online Teaching click here.
Human Computer Interaction Bibliography click here.
Human Computer Interaction click here.

Flashcards for your iPod click here.

mcrel

MERLOT (Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching click here.

nap

ncrel

nwrel
Quality in Distance Education click here.

School Website Development--web66

TERC

US Department of Education

U. Wisconsin Extension click here.
Web Teaching at Dartmouth click here.

webct

Wordclay self publishing click here.

 

 

Put a Link to Each of These Under Home

 

APA Writing Style Tutorial: http://JoanAitken.org/APA.html

CETL Resources for Faculty (Park University) http://www.park.edu/cetl/newfacresources.html

Communication Arts Department Program Goals: http://www.park.edu/communication/goals.html

Course Developer: Dr. Joan E. Aitken,

eCollege: http://parkonline.org/

Expectations & Guidelines for Students (General Examples): http://JoanAitken.org/Guidelines.html

Grading Grades in eCollege: http://parkonline.org/ Grading scale http://JoanAitken.org/Guidelines.html#GRADING_&_ASSIGNMENTS0

Institutional Research Board (IRB) Tutorial: http://JoanAitken.org/IRB/

Library Tutorial http://JoanAitken.org/LibraryTutorial/

Peer-reviewed Research Articles: http://www.park.edu/library/

Program Goals http://www.park.edu/grad/masters-cl-goals.aspx

Research Database Tutorial: http://JoanAitken.org/LibraryTutorial/

Survey Tutorial: http://JoanAitken.org/PS/Survey/

Tentative Syllabus located here: http://www.park.edu/syllabus/List.aspx

 

TEACHING @ PARK

 

One of our objectives in this course is to train our Communication and Leadership MA graduate students to be prepared to teach for Park University. We offer courses in Communication Arts at the Parkville campus, in the Kansas City area in 8-week accelerated format, at distance locations, and online. 

 

If you are approved for one method of teaching a particular course, you are approved for other formats.  The College for Distance Learning has a system to determine who will teach what course, which is dependent on course availability and faculty performance.

 

If you are interested in teaching Communication at Park University, in this course you will want to prepare instructional materials for a unit in a communication content areas listed below.  You will notice a content area link workshop at the lower left of the screen.  These are example course materials from that particular subject area.
 

1. Public Speaking

2. Interpersonal Communication

3. Public Relations

 

As you create your instructional materials for this course, you will put them together in a teaching portfolio to submit for employment at Park University.

 

APPLICATION TO TEACH AT PARK UNIVERSITY

 

 

Instead of completing the course final exam, you can apply to teach at Park University as a part-time faculty member after completing your MA degree.  Below are the application procedures for becoming part-time faculty.  You may need to scroll down the page.  If the University is not currently accepting applications in your area, you may need to hold your materials until a later time.  If there is a campus location near you, please apply there. 

 

Online faculty: http://captain.park.edu/portal/onlineforms/newfacultyrecruiting/teachonline.htm

Online application:  http://captain.park.edu/portal/onlineforms/instructorapp.asp

Kansas City area:  http://www.park.edu/human/kcarea.asp#Faculty

Outside the Kansas City area: http://www.park.edu/human/outsidekcarea.asp#Faculty

 

PARK UNIVERSITY EXPECTATION FOR PART-TIME FACULTY

 

CDL 751 is an online forum for faculty, which has resources and discussion.

CDL 750 is a training course to prepare you to teach online.

 

Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning.  You can complete a faculty development course and certificate, and submit that with your application. http://www.park.edu/cetl/

 

YOUR TEACHING PORTFOLIO

 

 

You will want to submit your application and the following materials to Park University.

  1. Undergraduate and graduate transcripts from all colleges and universities.  When you complete your MA in Communication and Leadership, you'll need to submit your final transcript.

  2. Resume.

  3. Request for the courses you want to teach and a justification (see the Park U. catalog).

  4. 3 Letters of reference (please obtain at least one from a faculty member of our Communication and Leadership program).

  5. Example syllabus, example test, and/or other instructional materials you developed for this course or elsewhere.

 

ONLINE COURSE DEVELOPMENT

 


As soon as you graduate, if you see an undergraduate course in Communication Arts, which you think you could develop online, please contact the department about it.  You might want to think about these courses in Org Com courses, which have been slated for online development.

CA200 Interviewing

CA235 Multicultural Communication

CA301 Interpersonal Communication 2

CA 302 Communication Ethics and Law

CA 348 Theories of Communication

CA 382 Communication Research Methods

CA402 Organizational Communication

CA420 Human Role in Group Interaction

CA275 Case Studies in Communication

CA491 Senior Project

CA404 and/or CA electives required for a total of 6 hours (two additional courses will be needed)

Professional learning required (one course, such as internship).

 

SELF-PUBLISHING AND CONSULTING

 

If you're not interested in teaching at Park University--which is absolutely fine--you will focus on communication and leadership content.  In that case, you will use the Kouzes and Posner text from the CA 670 Measuring Leadership course. 

 

LEADERSHIP PRACTICES INVENTORY

 

For those students interested in self-publishing their work, you'll find instructional information below.

Consulting

 

 

You may be interested in job hunting for a consulting position. Here is an example.

Contract Trainer - Live Auditions in Kansas
Company: SkillPath Seminars
Learn more about this company >>
View all jobs at this company >>

Click here to Navigate to the Company web site.
Independent Contract Trainer-SkillPath Seminars

OVERLAND PARK, KANSAS

Are you ready to deliver training for the best in the business as well as earn nationwide or worldwide recognition for your expertise in platform and presentation skills?

SkillPath Seminars (Headquarters in Kansas City) is the industry leader in business training and corporate development. We are currently recruiting Independent Contract Trainers to deliver SkillPath training programs for our corporate client's as well as our public seminars.

SkillPath Seminars conducts over 20,000 public seminars throughout the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand. In addition to our public seminars, we also provide customized workshops on-site at client's locations in each of these countries. Throughout our 18-year history in the training industry, SkillPath has trained professionals from each one of the Fortune 500 companies and since our inception, we have delivered training to over 6 million individuals.

As an Independent Contract Trainer you will lead SkillPath workshops for business & technical professionals that focus on management, leadership, supervision, teambuilding, project management, communication and technical skills. Our technical topics include: Microsoft Office, Microsoft Project, Networking and Adobe Photoshop.

We are the best in the industry at what we do and we expect our Independent Contract Trainers to uphold the highest standard of quality while representing SkillPath Seminars.

Requirements
 

Qualified applicants must have the following:
• A passion for public performance/speaking engagements
• A dedication to overcome challenges or obstacles to meet our client's training needs
• Ability to learn and deliver our program content at an expert level
• Exceptional communication and presentation skills
• A minimum of 2 years public speaking experience
• A 4-year degree is preferred
• Ability to travel throughout the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Australia or New Zealand

As an Independent Contract Trainer for SkillPath Seminars, we request a minimum commitment of 6 days per month to deliver our training programs. This position requires extensive travel and the location/frequency of travel is determined by business demand.

In addition to the contract payment fee and expense per diem, Independent Contract Trainers have the opportunity to earn additional income from SkillPath product sales at our public seminars and bonuses for referring leads that schedule on-site training.

Our audition process is easy:
• AN INFORMATIONAL MEETING WILL BE HELD AT THE DOUBLETREE HOTEL OVERLAND PARK - CORPORATE WOODS, 10100 COLLEGE BOULEVARD, OVERLAND PARK, KANSAS ON APRIL 3, 2008. This meeting will provide insightful information about SkillPath Seminars and what we are looking for in an Independent Contract Trainer.
• Those candidates interested in pursuing this contract position can sign up for a 7-10 minute video taped audition on a relevant business or technical topic of your choice the day following the information meeting at the same hotel location.
• IT IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED THAT YOU ATTEND THE INFORMATIONAL MEETING ON APRIL 3RD AT 7:00PM IN ORDER TO SECURE YOUR AUDITION TIME THE FOLLOWING DAY (APRIL 4th). We will make every attempt to accommodate walk-ins around the scheduled auditions times.
• Please bring a cover letter and current resume highlighting your presentation and business experience to your audition. Please include information if you are fluent in more than one language.
•Our staff will review your audition and resume and contact the individuals whom we would like to continue the interview process.

While it is to your benefit to attend our scheduled informational meeting and audition dates, if you cannot be present please contact:

SkillPath Seminars
Attn: Faculty Recruiting

6900 Squibb Road
Mission, KS 66202
[Click Here to Email Your Resumé]
1.800.873-7545

Please visit our website www.skillpath.com for more information about our services and products.

 

Self Publishing

 

 

This term, the consulting option involves self publishing your Workshop Unit (Core Assessment). Completing this phase will exempt you from the final exam for the course.

 

You can use your own self-publishing company. Online publishers include WordClay and CafePress.

 

To investigate WordClay click here to log in to begin the quick, easy process of publishing your work. Be sure to check out Services Store before you dive into publishing your book. Professional editing, interior book design and an ISBN and Channel Distribution are just a few of the beneficial services available to you as a Wordclay author. Help page, answer questions through Live Chat, or you can call toll-free directly at 877.655.1720.

 

Steps in the Self-Publishing through CafePress

  1. Edit your unit word for word multiple times to make sure grammar and spelling are perfect.

  2. Go to CafePress to read about their services: http://www.cafepress.com/cp/info/help/learn_book.aspx Take the time to read this information carefully. Select publication elements such as perfect binding. SELECT BOOK GENRE OR MARKET - FINALIZE BOOK MANUSCRIPT - BOOK LAYOUT, MARGINS, IMAGES - SELECT BOOK SIZE & BINDING - CREATE PDF FILE - DESIGN BOOK COVERS - UPLOAD PDF & COVERS

  3. Prepare the text and set up pages. Use desktop publishing software to lay it out so your work is camera-ready..

  4. Prepare front matter and an index.

  5. Prepare the cover. Take pictures and use Photoshop Elements or other program to prepare the cover. You will need a picture of yourself for a bio about the author on the back. Also write a sales paragraph about your book for the back cover. Prepare a catchy and descriptive title and overlay over an artistic photo. You may take a close up of an object, for example, do an artistic distortion, and wrap the photo from front to back. You'll need a high contrast area for any print for the title or back cover book summary and author bio. You'll also want the title on the spine so it shows on a shelf.

  6. If you prepare a 50 page book, we can publish your book bound with a cover for about $5.00 per copy. If you want an ISBN number and bar code so you can sell your book, it will cost an addition $250-300. You can prepare a few copies for family and friends and through CafePress.com, then decide later if you want to obtain the ISBN number and bar code to sell the book like a professional.

  7. Publish your book.

This information below is quoted directly from CafePress.com and for use only for enrolled students using this service. All rights reserved by the original copyright holder.

CafePress.com enables individuals, organizations, and companies to create and sell a wide variety of products online with zero upfront costs. We provide all the necessary tools and services for you to design your own products and build an online shop without investing in any inventory or software! This includes books!

Creating a properly formatted word processing document — one that can be successfully uploaded into PDF format — helps your final printed book meet book buyers' expectations. Because nimble word processing skills will definitely help, seek out a word processing professional if you get stuck. In the meantime, here's an article that should help with the details: Yes, You Can Use Microsoft Word to Set Type That Looks Professional."

The page size, and page length-formatted Word templates we've made available for your download and use are highly recommended. They will help with margin formatting issues, especially making the inside gutter" margin wide enough to read the full pages of perfect-bound books.

 

Sections of a book

Books are complicated and have many parts with different purposes. The following outlines the most common sections of books found in bookstores, typical content, pagination, and header/footer conventions.

Of course, if your book is a dissertation, training manual, or family history, for example, a publication you do not intend to be sold in bookstores (or even in yourCafePress.com store), feel free to organize your manuscript to your own tastes and needs!

In traditional book publishing, the parts (or sections) of a book, its layout, and reading order follow relatively strict conventions. Space and budgetary considerations may lead to some variations, however.

The first section readers see upon opening a book is called the front matter. This contains important information such as the book's ISBN, cataloguing-in-publication (CIP) data, and statements of copyright ownership.

Convention also dictates that a book has two pages, the left and the right. Obvious, yes, but this is important because certain pieces of information should be displayed on either the right (recto) or the left (verso) page.

The first page the reader usually sees upon opening a book will be the right-hand half-title page. It usually displays only the book's title, not the author name, subtitle, or other parts of a full title page (see below). The inside of the front cover is left blank.

Publishers also typically leave the reverse of the half-title page (the following left-hand page) blank. However, a number of items could appear on this page: a list of the author's previous works or other titles if the book is part of a series. If none of those exist, this is where a dedication could be placed.

 

The title page always appears on the right and contains:

 Full title, including the subtitle if one exists;
 Name of the author or names of authors if the book is collaboration;
 Names of contributors, such as editors, illustrators, and translators; and
 Name of the publisher and the publisher's logo.

Some publishers choose to place the table of contents on the R page opposite the copyright page (also called imprint page), while other publishers instead place the dedication here. It is more important to remember that convention states that half title, title, foreword, contents, and preface should be R pages, and should appear in the order given.

Pages following the preface might include an introduction, list of illustrations, list of acknowledgements, and a dedication if this hasn't been shown on the half-title L page. The various List of" sections might instead be placed in the book's back matter. Other sections of a book that appear in the back are index and about the author" statement.

Following pagination standard convention" often results in blank pages appearing in the front matter. Where blank pages are found, they are included in the pagination flow, but neither the number nor the header/footer should be displayed on the page.

 

COVERS/SPINE LOCATION

PAGE NAME

SAMPLE CONTENT

Front of book

Front Cover

Graphic, book title, subtitle (if any), author name(s)

Inside front cover

 

Usually blank; optional to include ISBN or UPC (Universal Product Code) numbers and bar codes

Vertical spine

Spine

Title, Author(s), Publisher logo (if available)

Inside back cover

 

BLANK

Back of book

Back Cover

  • Brief description of book's content

  • Author photo & qualifications (both optional, but highly recommended)

  • Book review/promotional quotes (definitely include if available)

  • ISBN + bar code (will be printed if available; be sure to leave sufficient white space)

  •  

    FRONT MATTER LOCATION

    PAGE NAME

    SAMPLE CONTENT

    1st R page after inside front cover

    OPTIONAL Promo Page OR blank

    IF use as Promo, include testimonials, reviews, or endorsements for the book; may also list author's other books

    Otherwise, leave BLANK

    1st L page

     

    BLANK

    2nd R page

    Half Title Page

    Contains only the title of the book, not author name(s) or subtitle (if any)

    L page facing full title page

     

    BLANK

    R page

    Full Title Page

    Display full title, subtitle (if any), & name of the author(s), editor or compiler of collection, photos, etc. (if any)

    L page

    Copyright Page

    Reverse of the Title Page contains the copyright notice, printing history, the Library of Congress Catalog number, ISBN, publisher name/address, & any additional copyright information.

    NOTE: Most CafePress.com books will contain only the copyright notice & possibly the ISBN.

    Notice of Copyright consists of these parts:

    Copyright 200X by [Author(s) Name]
    All rights reserved. No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without written permission, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical articles or reviews.
    Published 200X
    Printed by CafePress.com in the United States of America

    ISBN X-XXX-XXXXX-X

    [Date of copyright = when work reduced to tangible form]
    [Published & printed dates may be the same]

    NOTE: When text & photographs (or other content) have different copyright owners, list them individually:

    Text copyright 200X by [Author(s) Name]
    Photographs copyright 200X by [Photographer(s) Name]

    R page

    Dedication Page

    Short statement thanking an individual or group of individuals for their help or support

    L page

     

    BLANK

    R page

    Acknowledgements

    List of everyone who helped the author produce the book

    OPTIONAL, otherwise SKIP AHEAD TO TABLE OF CONTENTS

    L page

     

    NOT NEEDED IF SKIP ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

    Otherwise BLANK

    R page

    Table of Contents (TOC)

    Lists the book's contents, arranged by chapter. Can also break down by chapter section, subsection as displayed below:

    Number & Name of the chapter
     Optional: Subhead Name of a section within chapter
    Number & Name of the chapter
     Optional: Subhead Name of a section within chapter

    & so on

    L page

    TOC continued if needed

    Otherwise BLANK

    If TOC spans more than one additional page, continue to end on either L or R page.

    If end on L, start Chapter 1 on next R page.

    If end on R page, insert BLANK L page, then start Chapter 1 on next R page

    R page

    IF INCLUDED, CONTINUE WITH L/R PAGINATION UNTIL FIRST OPEN R PAGE, THEN START CHAPTER 1

    IF NOT INCLUDED, GO AHEAD & START BODY OF THE BOOK WITH CHAPTER 1

    ALL ARE OPTIONAL

    Foreword
    Preface
    Introduction
    List of Abbreviations
    List of Illustrations
    Disclaimers

    ALL ARE OPTIONAL:

    Foreword:
    Testimonial or introduction by someone other than the author

    Preface:
    Explanation of the origins & history of the book written by the book's author(s)

    Introduction:
    Short summary or explanation of the book

    List of Abbreviations:
    List of the abbreviations contained in the book

    List of Illustrations:
    List of all illustrations, figures or diagrams, with page numbers of where they're found in the book

    Disclaimers:
    Short conditional statement about the use of the book. Included to provide a small amount of legal protection to the author

     

    BODY TEXT

    MATTER LOCATION

    PAGE NAME

    SAMPLE CONTENT

    R page

    Chapter One

    Can be spelled out OR displayed in numerals

    Name of the chapter & body text of chapter. May be divided into subsections that display subheads.

    Succeeding L & R pages display continuous content of Chapter 1 until end

    L or R page

    Succeeding Chapters

    Convention dictates that each new Chapter STARTS on an R page, even if that means the preceding L page is BLANK.

    However, it is perfectly acceptable to continue L/R pagination throughout the remaining body text of your book without forcing an R page start for each new chapter.

    The primary reason for not forcing R page starts for each new chapter is to save paper.

     

    BACK MATTER LOCATION

    PAGE NAME

    SAMPLE CONTENT

    R page

    IF INCLUDED, & CHAPTERS WERE NOT FORCED INTO R PAGE STARTS, CONTINUE WITH L/R PAGINATION UNTIL END

    IF CHAPTERS FORCE R PAGE STARTS, USE SAME PAGINATION FOR ALL SECTIONS OF BACK MATTER

    ALL ARE OPTIONAL

    End Notes
    Appendix
    Glossary
    Bibliography
    Works Cited
    Index
    Author Bio
    Order Blank

    ALL ARE OPTIONAL:

    End Notes:
    Additional information about a statement made in the text & usually referenced by a number

    Appendix:
    Collection of important information & other resources

    Glossary:
    List of terms found in the book & their definitions

    Bibliography:
    List of books, articles & other resources the author used in writing the book

    Works Cited:
    List of books, articles & other resources the author cited in the text of the book

    Index:
    List of key words & associated page numbers designed to help the reader find important information inside the book. The Index should not list chapters, but rather terms & concepts found within chapters. Indexing is a combination of skill & intuition. Usually the last section in a book.

    Author(s) Bio:
    Short author biography (possibly including photo) is usually included in all books other than a mass-market paperback Do not include in back matter if also displayed on back cover.

    Order Form:
    Blank, left-hand page at the end of the book that can be used to order additional copies

     

    Information below is quoted directly or closely adapted from Sampson, B. (2007). Sell your book on Amazon. Denver: Outskirts Press. This information is provided only for students enrolled in this course, who have bought the book. The purpose is to help students focus on key information. This content is protected by the original publisher's copyright. You may want to use the textbook author's services: http://www.outskirtspress.com/

     

    Chapter 1. Get listed.

     

    If you have a book, Amazon and makes it possible to reach a worldwide audience almost effortlessly.

    You must acquire an ISBN, international standard book number, for your book. if you do not have an ISBN, you can get one from the US. ISBN agency www.isbn.org in sets of 10 for $225.

     

    Once you have an ISBN, you will also need a barcode. The barcode is a scanable graphic on the back of most book covers. The ISBN agency will sell you a barcode for each ISP and that you acquire for a slightly higher fee. You provide the ISBN and retail price, and in return, you receive a barcode, usually in the form of a high-resolution graphic such as a TIF or JPG.

     

    once you have copies of your book with an ISBN and bar code, visit www.Amazon.com/advantage to applying for the Amazon advantage program. Review their contracts while terms carefully. There are contractual annual fee, about $30, is not refundable and their commission is 55% of your retail price.

     

    Your book has the opportunity to be listed at like any traditionally published or on-demand published book, with its own Amazon listing.

     

    Be sure to complete the book detail page.

     

    You still need to upload your cover image and book description, set your subject categories, BISAC codes, and complete all the elements of your book detail page.

     

    your next step is mailing copies of your book to Amazon at your cost. Amazon notifies you via e-mail whenever you need to send more books. You might bring a one or two books to begin with. Amazon strives to keep between two and three weeks of inventory in its warehouse at any given time. You always pay for shipping and you cannot control the number of copies Amazon orders at a time. You must account for the shipping and production costs, while determining your profitability.

     

    POD, print on demand, publishing.

    By publishing your book through a turnkey POD service provider, your book will typically meet all the requirements set forth by the Amazon advantage program. EDI or electronic data interchange, distribution will involve ingrown and maker in Taylor.

    If you publish an on-demand edition through an on-demand publisher that distributes through Ingram's EDI feed, then your book is then listed online with Amazon and Barnes & Noble through their EDI distribution partnerships.

    To successfully publish an on-demand edition simultaneously with an offset version, be sure that you choose a publisher that lets you use your own ISBN and imprint name if you choose. Very few on-demand publishers offer this level of flexibility, so that will help narrow down your choices.

    .

    Chapter 2. Author connect and author profiles.

     

    Once your book is listed on Amazon for sale, your next step involves the creation of Amazon connect account in completing your author profile page.

     

    You must have an Amazon account to successfully promote your book on Amazon, and it needs to be unverified, valid account.

    Complete the confirmation steps for your MSN connect account. www.amazon.com/gp/pdp

     

    This chapter gives you suggestions about the author photo and caption, the about me section, your profile page, your Amazon blog, your bibliography, latest activity, and makes suggestions for doing reviews. You will also want to consider list mania, Amazon guidance, Amazon friends, search suggestions, tags and wikis.

     

    The book detail page is the single most important Amazon page for authors is the page that showcases their book. The sales page, or book detail page, has all the information at consumer will need to make a purchasing decision. It is the page on Amazon and access solely for the purpose of informing people about your book and selling copies of your book. Amazon presents webpages dynamically to the user based upon the user's preferences. Amazon creates a personal shopping experience based upon products that person has bought in the past. Search inside digitized is your book and makes it available to dissect and analyze. By scanning and storing the contents, Amazon extracts information in addition to the title, author name, an ISBN. You will need to input information in an array of categories: title information, list price, Amazon marketplace, marketplace submissions, tell a friend, additional image views, product promotions, better together/best value, help others find this item, customers who bought, editorial reviews, product details, Amazon sales rank, Amazon connects, inside this book, citations, what do authors, take this product, are you the publisher, rate this item, customer reviews, customer discussions, and the PDF community, list mania, so you'd like to, look for similar items.

     

    MAJOR ASSIGNMENTS

    Teaching and Training

    Course Learning Outcomes (Behavioral Objectives)

     

    The student will be able to

    1. Design course management elements, including behavioral objectives.

    2. Analyze and evaluate effective methods of training and development.

    3. Prepare, present, and assess a training/instruction unit, which is organized around a Needs-Centered model of training.

    4. Apply best practices in teaching or training content related to learning communication at the college or adult level.

    5. Evaluate contemporary communication education research, which can be applied in organizational contexts.

    6. Apply needs assessment questionnaires, task analysis, training plans, or other teaching/training planning and evaluation tools.

    7. Demonstrate effective use of instructional technology.

    8. Write a business model for contract work in training and development consulting.

    Deadlines Poster

    Source: allposters.com

    Assignments

    There is much flexibility in how students may approach this course. Typically, the core assignment in this course is to create one two-hour face-to-face or a comparable online instructional unit or multiple smaller instructional units, where your goal is to teach skill(s). Please adapt the assignment to your learning goals, while making sure it fulfills your professor's expectations. Please use one or more of the following general topic areas.

    • Interpersonal Communication

    • Public Speaking

    • Public Relations

    • Kouzes and Posner Leadership Practices

     

    Typically, you will prepare the entire unit by week 6, then actually present the unit at work or to some friends during week 7. Remember, submit your core assessment by week 6, actually present week 7, and reflect week 8.

     

    The sublinks in this Assignments link show you supplemental information and step-by-step processes for your work.

     

    Because different people in the course have different goals, there is much latitude in the assignment. Maybe you need to prepare a specific training unit for your place of work. Maybe you're a graduate assistant who will teach two class meetings for the regular professor. Maybe you plan to volunteer to teach a leadership workshop at your place of worship. Go for it! Please propose your alternative course assignment to your professor week one. Unless you make arrangement with your professor, your professor will assume you will be following the guidelines listed in the subtopics.

     

    Remember, if you want to work ahead and need to see some content that is not current revealed in the course shell, you can use your computer search function--control F in most cases--to find items on the course planning page.

     

    http://www.funnypicturefunnyphoto.com/funny-picture-photo-dog-Jack-Russel-charlietyack-pic.jpg

    http://www.funnypicturefunnyphoto.com

    HTML clipboard

    Font

    Unless your professor tells you otherwise, use a 12 Arial font, double-space everything using 1/2 inch indents at the beginning of paragraphs.

     

    How to Submit Assignments

    Your professor may be flexible, but make sure you submit somewhere by the due date, and if your professor can't find it, give him or her directions. Typically, you will submit in the eCollege assignment dropbox or in the Discussion Board as part of the post (not an attachment). If you email your professor an assignment to meet a deadline or because there's a problem, you will have a couple days to resubmit inside eCollege. Hardcopies are fine too and can be mailed. then your professor will mail them back to you.

     

    Naming Files

    Make sure you name your files starting with your last name and something descriptive of the assignment.  Keep the file name relatively short, with no spaces, and that may help.

     

    Acceptable Formats

    Use your program's "Save As" format to save your file to a format eCollege can recognize.  Acceptable formats include Microsoft Word (file extension .doc), PowerPoint (.ppt), rich text format (extension .rft), text format (.txt), or PDF (.pdf). You can probably use Word's print function to create a pdf file, which has the advantage of being unable to transmit a virus. Please do not submit other formats, including the one requiring the LPI format. I cannot open other formats inside eCollege.  Vista and 2007 need to be saved into the older formats listed above.
     

    Due Date

    Assignments are due online before Sunday at 11:59 PM Parkville time (Central regular or daylight savings).

     

    Discussion Board

    Weekly unit links are available for use only by week in order to encourage students to interact with each other as they work through the material. For online students, beginning at the end of week two, the week's online discussion board access will be removed (blocked) at the end of each week. 

     

    Dropbox for Major Weekly Assignment

    The dropboxes are located via the "Assignments:" link so that you can access the major weekly tasks all term.

     

    Course Developer Contact

    Dr. J. Aitken, Professor, Communication Arts
    229 Copley, 8700 NW River Park Drive, Park University, Parkville, MO 64152
    816-584-6785 (message/office).

     

    Discussion of Learning Activities

     

    The purpose of the Discussion Board is for you to reflect on your learning and collaborate with other students.

     

    The weekly assignments that will be graded by your professor need to be uploaded in the dropbox.

     

    EFFECTIVE WRITING STYLE

    For assignment credit, meet graduate level writing expectations, including effective capitalization, spelling, and grammar.  Use complete sentences so that your ideas make sense.  If you find eCollege difficult, write your post in Microsoft Word, then cut and paste into eCollege.  No one worries about an error now and then, but make sure these assignments show high quality communication skills. Effective writing style shows that you care about your readers and your ideas.

     

    STUDENT INTERACTION

    The discussion board is an opportunity for you to engage with other students in the course about your course learning.  In addition to your substantive contributions, you will want to respond, probe, and encourage each other.

     

    FOR YOUR BENEFIT

    Your professor may stay out of the conversation completely. The objective is for you to select ideas you want to discuss with other students in the class. You will see multiple learning activities each week--including ones from the textbook--in the discussion board. Please select a couple activities to do and discuss online. To the extent possible, apply them to the preparation of your core assessment project.


    USE GOOD EMAIL COMMUNICATION

    Readers expect discussion posts to be lively, in your own words, in correct writing style, and to the point.  Posts should be substantive enough to say something (50-100 words).  Students are busy and don't want to read a long and boring email. 

     

    No attachments please because they take time to open and put the receiver's computer at risk of a virus.

     

    SINGLE TOPIC FOR EACH POST
    Ideas are easier to follow and respond to if you use a single idea for each posting.  By putting the topic at the beginning of the first sentence, other students will be able to tell if they want to read your post.

    REQUIRED
    Requirements vary each week.  Typically, you need a couple Textbook Learning Activities, an idea from the reading, and Talk Turkey each week.  You will want two other postings, including one of the choices that interests you and one or two substantive responses to other students.
     

    ENGAGE ONLINE
    Because the discussion is designed to engage you throughout the course, you cannot access the discussion early.  Remember that part of your participation grade is interaction with other students in the class. This is conversation, not one way communication.

     

    DROPDOWN MENU

    Notice the dropdown menu so that you post to the appropriate threads.

     

    DUE DATES

    Except for week one, the discussion closes at the end of the week.  The threads are designed to close by midnight Kansas City, Missouri time on Sunday night. The due days are guidelines.  Make sure you go in at least two different days so you can interact with others, not just tell people what you think.

     

    HOW WOULD YOU USE ONLINE DISCUSSION IN YOUR TEACHING OR TRAINING?

    As you are involved in the discussion postings, think about how you might prompt students to engage more in an online course.  Does this discussion board feel like students are engaged or just posting an assignment because they are required?  What does it take to make people truly interact in the learning process?

     

    WHICH ONES?

    There is flexibility, but please provide multiple posts--about five--each week, including at least one substantial interactive response to another students in the class.  Focus on the "required" threads and do others that interest you.

     

     

     

    Core Assessment


    The goal in this course for each student to:

    Prepare and teach/train one 2-hour instructional teaching/training unit.

     

    The weekly assignments are steps toward that goal, so that you can simply put together everything into your cumulative week 6 core assessment project.

    Your core assessment project can be any relevant topic to your job or future teaching/training needs. Many students in the class would like to teach for Park University, so they are focusing on an area that they may currently or will in the future teach. This assignment is very flexible and can be adapted to individual student interests.

     

    If you want, you can create two 1-hour training/teaching units on two different topics. To the extent possible, everything should be real, not fictional.

     

    The students will prepare, present, and evaluate these materials. Units should meet standards of Park University instruction or professional consulting in an organizational context.

    Are you ready?

     

    Options

    If you want to provide an alternative assignment as your core assessment, please make arrangements with your professor by week two of the course.

     

    Your professor will determine the exact assignments and weighting for this course. Thus, the examples below are simply examples, which may be different for your particular section. Talk to your professor or see "Gradebook" tab at top of screen.

     

    Weekly Steps

    Annotated bibliography and task analysis of what you will teach for the instructional project (Wk 2 in Assignment link dropbox) 

    Needs analysis (Wk 3 in Assignment link dropbox) 

    Instructional materials including (a)Behavioral objectives (b) Learning activities designed to engage students/trainees, instructional materials, handouts, learning games, visual aids, PowerPoint, and other supporting materials.  Include the Participant’s Guide/Workbook containing all training handouts and materials for your unit.  (c) Test/assessment measure of objectives (Wk 4 in Assignment link dropbox).(Wk 4 in Assignment link dropbox).

    Week 5, revise and improve instructional materials.

    Core assessment (Wk 6 in Assignment link dropbox) Put all weekly materials together with your latest work into ONE FILE YOU SUBMIT AS THE CORE ASSESSMENT PROJECT. A PowerPoint presentation may be a separate file from the rest.

    Presentation to live audience AND provide a segment for other students to see.

    Self-reflection Week 8 (in week 8 discussion)

     

    Content

    You will notice there is a content link on the left for each of these areas.

     

    Core Assessment Grading Rubric

    Exceeds Expectations

    In addition to "Meets Expectations," also includes:

    Meets Expectations

    Below Expectations

    No Evidence

    I. Cognitive Skills

    Learning outcomes 3, 5

    Demonstrate depth and breadth of 6 or more, high quality communication sources beyond course materials.

    Prepare, present, and assess training/instruction units, which are organized around a Needs-Centered model of training.

     

    Evaluate contemporary communication education research, which can be applied in organizational contexts. 

     

    Use 4-5 high quality, communication studies sources.

    Lack one of more elements required for meetings expectations.

    Same quality from before enrolling in this course or fails to submit in required format by original due date or shows no evidence of meeting expectations.

    II. Technical or Professional skills

    Learning outcomes 1, 8

    Submit material for professional presentation or publication.

    Design course management elements, including behavioral objectives. OR

     

    Create a business model for contract work in training and development consulting.

     

    Lack one of more elements required for meetings expectations.

    Same quality from before enrolling in this course or fails to submit in required format by original due date or shows no evidence of meeting expectations.

     

    III. Professional Disposition

    Learning outcomes 2, 4

    Write instructional/training unit using an array of teaching/training strategies.

     

     

    Analyze and evaluate effective methods of training and development.

     

    Apply best practices in teaching/training communication content at the college or adult level by using 2-3 interactive teaching/training strategies.

     

    Lack one of more elements required for meetings expectations.

    Same quality from before enrolling in this course or fails to submit in required format by original due date or shows no evidence of meeting expectations.

    IV. Leadership Skills

    Learning outcomes 6, 7

    Collaborate with most other students in the course.

    Apply needs assessment questionnaires, task analysis, training plans, and other planning and evaluation tools.

     

    Demonstrate effective use of instructional technology through PowerPoint or other method.

     

    Submit all materials together on time.

    Lack one of more elements required for meetings expectations.

    Same quality from before enrolling in this course or fails to submit in required format by original due date or shows no evidence of meeting expectations.

     

     

    Instructional or Training Module of Core Assessment Guidelines

     

    Due in parts each week.  Entire package as ONE FILE is due Week 6.

     

    Write a professional quality two-hour communication training unit appropriate for teaching a college course, providing a training unit at work, consulting, or publication. Synthesize the materials you have prepared to date into a whole unit. This should be substantive (20-75 pages). Include everything you have done so far to build this into a cohesive unit.

     

    You may submit as a hardcopy or electronic file depending on the nature of your work. You are welcome to select a training project you already have done and use this opportunity to substantively improve the quality of your work. You may present to the professor, class, or in a real world context.

    There is much flexibility on this assignment, if you will receive professor approval early
     

    Effective teaching and training require much preparation.  You need to have a recipe to follow, but you will want to spice it up your own way.

     

    1. Topic of the teaching/training unit.

    2. Task analysis of the step-by step information you will/did teach/train in your 2-hour unit.

    3. Annotated bibliography about the content area you will teach.

    4.  Needs analysis of the students/trainees.  Describe the function and goals of the organization/institution and the specific group of people you will/did teach/train. Fit this assignment to your work situation.

    5.  Measurable learning objectives for your instructional/training unit.  Use those objectives to prepare the assessment measure (test) for the students/trainees.  Each test question needs to be linked to the objectives.

    6.  Test for trainees/students and results, which is an assessment measure with all questions directly related to the learning objectives.  Give the test, show the test and results, and interpret the results in your final core assessment report due week 6.

    6.  All learning activities designed to engage students/trainees, instructional materials, handouts, learning games, visual aids, PowerPoint, and other supporting materials.  Include the Participant’s Guide/Workbook containing all training handouts and materials for your unit.


     

    WEEK 2  Bibliography and Task Analysis for Core Assessment


    1. TOPIC YOU WILL TEACH/TRAIN.

    Determine the general topic area (Interpersonal Communication, Public Speaking, Public Relations, or Kouzes and Posner Leadership Practices). Within that general topic, select a specific topic to teach. Describe your communication training topic (team building, public speaking, conflict management, problem solving, decision making, negotiating, interviewing, meeting management, etc.) appropriate for organizational training. The topic should permit a focus on skills rather than knowledge or information.

     

    2. TASK ANALYSIS OF WHAT YOU WILL TEACH/TRAIN.

    Then prepare a task analysis of the skill(s) you will be teaching. A task analysis is a step-by-step procedure that the student will learn. The task analysis describes all mental and physical characteristics. Use complete sentences so the ideas are clear.  This will involve a step-by­step outline listing of the skills, knowledge, and behaviors necessary to perform the skill in the order the skills will be taught.  See chapter 3.

     

    3. ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY.

    Prepare an annotated bibliography of at least five sources about the content you will teach/train.  An annotation is an APA reference listing followed by an paragraph abstract about the source's information. For this course, you may use the abstract written by the original author or database or you can write your own.

    SMILE!  You'll be able to find more materials than you need, which already exist.

     

    NOTE:  Good teachers and trainers do not re-invent everything from scratch every time.  They build a repetroire of resources they can use from other experiences educators.  Feel free to take and adapt any and all relevant materials from the Internet, instructor's manuals, and other sources.  Do MAKE SURE YOU SITE THE SOURCE OF INFORMATION AND MATERIALS YOU USE.  If you are using the Internet, just put the link and make it a hotlink, so you can go back there when you want.  For our purposes, I'm not too concerned about following APA exactly, but whoever sees the material should be able to find the original.  In your PowerPoint, please cite the source of each visual.

     

    Park University has excellent electronic databases. If you are unfamiliar with how to use the databases, use the tutorial below.

    Avoiding Plagiarism: click here.

    Academic integrity, although another university’s policy, true in any case: click here.

    APA citation style: click here.

    Analyze perceptions of others through interviews or survey (Idea 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6).

    Reference List, click here

     

     

    Bibliography

     

    BOOKS

    Adler, Proctor, Towne, Looking Out/Looking In, 12th edition, Wadsworth, 2007 or latest edition. ISBN: 049509580X

    Articles from the peer reviewed journal Communication Education.

    Beebe, S. A., Mottet, T. P., and Roach, K. D. (2004). Training and development: Enhancing communication and leadership skills. Allyn & Bacon.

    DeVito, Interpersonal Communication Book w/CD, 11th edition, Pearson, 2006 or latest edition. ISBN 0205472885

    Biech, E. (2001). The Consultant's Quick Start Guide: An Action Plan for Your First Year in Business.

    Fujishin, R. Natural Speaker, 4th edition or latest edition, Allyn & Bacon, 2003 or latest edition. ISBN 0205359531

    Griffin, C. L. Invitation to Public Speaking, Wadsworth/Thomson Learning, 2006 or latest edition. ISBN 0495006556

    Lucas, S. E. Art of Public Speaking (Text), 8th edition, McGraw Hill, 2004 or latest edition. ISBN: 0005617391

    Lucas, S. E. Art of Public Speaking-+ Learning Tools Suite, 9th edition, McGraw, 2007 or latest edition. ISBN 0073228656

    Natalle, E. J. (2007). Teaching interpersonal communication: Resources and readings. Bedford/St. Martin’s.

    Verderber, K. S., Verderber, R. F., & Berryman-Fink, C. (2006). Inter-act: Interpersonal communication concepts, skills, and contexts. (10th or latest ed). New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780195300642 or ISBN 0195300645.

    Weiss, A. (2003). Organizational Consulting: How to Be an Effective Internal Change Agent 

    Weiss, A. (2005). Million Dollar Consulting (TM) Toolkit: Step-By-Step Guidance, Checklists, Templates and Samples from "The Million Dollar Consultant."

         

    ARTICLES

    Allen, M., Cheng, C., Izumi, M., Kopaczewski, S., Tye-Williams, S., & Wilkum, K. (2003, Winter). MENTOR REVIEWING: A RETROSPECTIVE ON AN EXPERIMENT. Communication Studies, 54(4), 530-534.

    Bippus, A., Kearney, P., Plax, T., & Brooks, C. (2003, August). Teacher Access and Mentoring Abilities: Predicting the Outcome Value of Extra Class Communication. Journal of Applied Communication Research, 31(3), 260.

    BUILDING AND DEVELOPING YOUR TEAM. (2005, February). Strategic Communication Management,

    Canary, D., & MacGregor, I. (2008, January). Differences That Make a Difference in Assessing Student Communication Competence. Communication Education, 57(1), 41-63.

    Canary, H. (2007, April). Teaching Ethics in Communication Courses: An Investigation of Instructional Methods, Course Foci, and Student Outcomes. Communication Education, 56(2), 193-208.

    Catt, S., Miller, D., & Schallenkamp, K. (2007, Spring). YOU ARE THE KEY: COMMUNICATE FOR LEARNING EFFECTIVENESS. Education, 127(3), 369-377.

    Cornelius, T., Alessi, G., & Shorey, R. (2007, April). The Effectiveness of Communication Skills Training With Married Couples: Does the Issue Discussed Matter?. Family Journal, 15(2), 124-132.

    Craumer, M. (2001, December). How to Coach Your Employees. Harvard Management Communication Letter, 4(12), 9.

    Deifell, D. (2007, January). The Keynote Address and Its Occasion. Communication Teacher, 21(1), 1-5.

    Deliberating About and Beyond the Basic Public Speaking Course. (2005, Summer). Texas Speech Communication Journal,

    Emery, D. (2006). Front and Center: Speaking, Listening, and Assessment in the Contexts of Communication Instruction. International Journal of Listening, 20, 62-65.

    Fleury, A. (2005, January). Liberal Education and Communication Against the Disciplines. Communication Education, 54(1), 72-79.

    Fredricks, S. (2005, July). Teaching Impromptu Speaking: A Pictorial Approach. Communication Teacher, 19(3), 75-79.

    Gibson, J., & Hanson, T. (2007, Winter). The Breakfast of Champions: Teaching Audience Analysis Using Cereal Boxes. Texas Speech Communication Journal, 31(1), 49-50.

    Halford, W., Sanders, M., & Behrens, B. (2001, December). Can Skills Training Prevent Relationship Problems in At-Risk Couples? Four-Year Effects of a Behavioral Relationship Education Program. Journal of Family Psychology, 15(4), 750-768.

    HELLERMANN, J. (2007, Spring). The Development of Practices for Action in Classroom Dyadic Interaction: Focus on Task Openings. Modern Language Journal, 91(1), 83-96.

    Hewett, B., & Powers, C. (2007, Winter). Guest Editors' Introduction: Online Teaching and Learning: Preparation, Development, and Organizational Communication. Technical Communication Quarterly, 16(1), 1-11.

    Katz, S. (2008, January). Assessing a Hybrid Format. Journal of Business & Technical Communication, 22(1), 92-110.

    Kleinman, S. (2006). Teachers Open the Door, You Enter by Yourself: Best Practices in Online Graduate Education. Conference Papers -- International Communication Association,

    Kummer, A. (2006, October 17). Mentoring: More Than Teaching. ASHA Leader, 11(14), 39-39.

    Kurylo, A. (2007, July). Teaching about Assessment in Professional Organizations. Communication Teacher, 21(3), 93-98.

    Leung, T., & Kim, M. (2007). Eight Conflict Handling Styles: Validation of Model and Instrument. Journal of Asian Pacific Communication (09576851), 17(2), 173-198.

    McKenzie, L., & Saunders, J. (2007, Winter). Facing the Fear: Methods for Addressing Speech Anxiety in Public Speaking Class. Texas Speech Communication Journal, 31(1), 53-54.

    Mortenson, S. (2007, July). Raising the Question #7 Should We Teach Personal Transformation as a Part of Interpersonal Communication? If so, How is it Done?. Communication Education, 56(3), 401-408.

    Mottet, T., & Beebe, S. (2006, July). The Relationships Between Student Responsive Behaviors, Student Socio-Communicative Style, and Instructors’ Subjective and Objective Assessments of Student Work. Communication Education, 55(3), 295-312.

    Nicosia, G. (2005). DEVELOPING AN ONLINE WRITING INTENSIVE COURSE: WILL IT WORK FOR PUBLIC SPEAKING?. International Journal of Instructional Media, 32(2), 163-170.

    O'Hair, D. (2006, April). What is NCA all about?. Spectra, 42(4), 3-6.

    Olswang, L., Coggins, T., & Svensson, L. (2007, April). Assessing Social Communication in the Classroom. Topics in Language Disorders, 27(2), 111-127.

    O'Riordan, C. (2007, June). Examining the Communication of Personal Commitment: An Actor-Partner Interdependence Model Analysis. Southern Communication Journal, 72(3), 229-245.

    Pearson, J., Student, J., & Kahl, D. (2006, August). Preparation Meeting Opportunity: How Do College Students Prepare for Public Speeches?. Communication Quarterly, 54(3), 351-366.

    Pulaski, M. (2007, April). Getting to Know You: Breaking the Ice in the Public Speaking Course. Communication Teacher, 21(2), 58-61.

    Quianthy, R. (2005, January). NCA offers Web portal to communication courses. Spectra, 41(1), 36-36.

    Roberts, J. (2007, May). Benefits of Department Membership. Spectra, 43(5), 7-7.

    Roselyn Lee, J., Nass, C., Brave, S., Morishima, Y., Nakajima, H., & Yamada, R. (2007, June). The Case for Caring Colearners: The Effects of a Computer-Mediated Colearner Agent on Trust and Learning. Journal of Communication, 57(2), 183-204.

    Schmidt, J., & Uecker, D. (2007, October). Increasing Understanding of Routine/Everyday Interaction in Relationships. Communication Teacher, 21(4), 112-117.

    Seiter, J., & Gass, R. (2007, April). Teaching Students How to Analyze and Adapt to Audiences. Communication Teacher, 21(2), 45-48.

    Stephens, K., & Mottet, T. (2008, January). Interactivity in a Web Conference Training Context: Effects on Trainers and Trainees. Communication Education, 57(1), 88-104.

    Teven, J. (2007, July). Teacher Temperament: Correlates with Teacher Caring, Burnout, and Organizational Outcomes. Communication Education, 56(3), 382-400.

    Tietjen, P., Southard, S., & Bates, C. (2005, February). Online Learning Effectiveness. Technical Communication, 52(1), 103-104.

    Using coaching to improve communication across functions and cultures at Hess. (2006, April). Business Communicator,

    Vice, J., & Carnes, L. (2001, March). Developing Communication and Professional Skills Through Analytical Reports. Business Communication Quarterly, 64(1), 84-98.

    Waldeck, J. (2007, October). Answering the Question: Student Perceptions of Personalized Education and the Construct's Relationship to Learning Outcomes. Communication Education, 56(4), 409-432.

    Waldron, V., & Yungbluth, S. (2007, June). Assessing Student Outcomes in Communication-Intensive Learning Communities: A Two-Year Longitudinal Study of Academic Performance and Retention. Southern Communication Journal, 72(3), 285-302.

    Why coaching is critical to success. (2005, May). Business Communicator,

    Wilde, S., Cuny, K., & Vizzier, A. (2006). Peer-to-Peer Tutoring: A Model for Utilizing Empathetic Listening to Build Client Relationships in the Communication Center. International Journal of Listening, 20, 70-75.

    Williams, D. (2006, Winter). Teaching Co-Cultures in the Public Speaking Course. Texas Speech Communication Journal, 30(2), 193-195.

    Winter, J., Neal, J., & Waner, K. (2001, September). How Male, Female, and Mixed-Gender Groups Regard Interaction and Leadership Differences in the Business Communication Course. Business Communication Quarterly, 64(3), 43-58.

     

    Cat Reading Art Print by Helga Sermat

    Source: allposters.com


     

    WEEK 3:  Needs Analysis for Core Assessment Project
    (1-2 pages)  This assignment is part of your core assessment project.


    1. Describe the function and goals of an organization/institution and the needs and wants of the specific people you will teach/train. Fit this assignment to your core assessment project (Approximately 1 page).


    2. Design a brief test (assessment measure) to assess the communication teaching/training needs of the students/employees to be trained. (Approximately 1 page). 
    This can be a pretest,  which you again administer as the post-test.  If a pretest, all questions need to be directly related to the learning objectives.  For example, in CA 517, I give students a sample of questions from the final exam during the first day.  This gives me insight into their background.
     

    You may want to summarize the “results” describing the communication skill needs for your particular project in a table.  You may or may not be able to collect the results this week.  For CA 517, I usually have three general categories regarding high, medium, and low performance. But I could categorize the results according to how many know statistics, how many know the scientific method and research principles, and how many know communication research principles.

    The idea is to assess the group prior to training/teaching.  You may or may not actually be able to do this this week, but you can at least come up with the measure.  You probably have to add the results to your core assessment project after you actually present.

    If you can't assess the whole group in advance, you might ask an opinion leader or two.

    Even if it's very simple, like "This unit is about xyz.  What do you know about this topic?  What do you want or need to know about the topic?

    4. Summarize the “results” in dialog form identifying the implication of the “results’ for training.
     

    A Needs Analysis is a good thing.


     

     

    WEEK 4:  Instructional Materials for Core Assessment

    (a) Behavioral objectives.  The learning outcome need to be observable and measurable.

    EXAMPLE

    At the end of the unit, the student will be able to:

    1.  Name three ways to practice an upcoming speech.

    2.  Write an outline using Monroe's Motivated Sequence.

    With these two objectives, they would be the content of the test.

     

    (b) Learning activities designed to engage students/trainees, instructional materials, handouts, learning games, visual aids, PowerPoint, and other supporting materials.  Include the Participant’s Guide/Workbook containing all training handouts and materials for your unit. 

     

    (c) Test/assessment measure of objectives (Wk 4 in Assignment link dropbox).
     
    Based on your needs assessment, develop 1 to 5 specific instruction objectives for a multi session or two hour workshop for your core assessment project.  These need to be
    measurable learning objectives for your instructional/training unit. 

     

    Use those objectives to prepare the assessment measure (test) for the students/trainees. You will give the test, show the test and results, and interpret the results in your final core assessment.

    • The objectives need to be based on behavioral outcomes.

    • Use one idea per objective.

    • Be realistic about what you can do in a 2-hour instructional/training unit.

    • Prepare a test that is directly linked to the behavioral objectives.

     

    Typically, the fewer the objectives, the shorter the test.  (grin)  You need a test that informs you about what students learned.

     

    Park University's expectations about writing learning outcomes (AKA behavioral objectives):

    http://www.park.edu/cetl/quicktips/writinglearningobj.html

     

    Example

    If your objective says "identify 3 characteristics of President Obama's public speaking language style," then you could use a multiple choice question in your test like this.

     

    Which of the following is NOT a characteristics of President Obama's public speaking language use?

    a.  Repetitious language.

    b.  Conciliatory language.

    c.  Aggressive language.*

    d.  Language of hope.

     

    You have to know where you're going if you want to get there.


     

    WEEK 5:  Get It Together! 


    Pull together what you have so far and complete your instructional unit so that you can present it to a live group/class/audience within the next two weeks.  You'll need to prepare:

    • All instructional materials you will use during the presentation.

    • Participant learning activities.

    • Handouts for participants.

     

    Plan  If you are preparing a training unit you want to sell, you may want to do the following.


    1. Cover letter (may be a cover letter for your teaching application or recruitment information for an employee workshop)
    2. Instructional Unit or Workshop title

    3. Syllabus for course or Agenda for employee workshop.  Think about what is missing in this course's syllabus and other courses you have taken.  How will you make sure you have covered all important aspects so your students understand what is coming and what you expect?
    4. Workshop or unit description for promotional purposes (1-2 paragraphs)
    5. Content outline
    6. Behavioral objectives (revised from previous assignment)
    7. Qualifications of Trainer (1-2 paragraphs). You may want to write a third-person perspective bio something like this. 

     

    Dr. Joan E. Aitken will be the leader of the upcoming Leadership Measurement workshop.  Aitken has taught at four state universities and a private university.  Among her favorite courses in communication studies. . . .

     

    You'll feel good when you have this segment ready.


     

     

     

     

    WEEK 6 Core Assessment Due

     

    Put all weekly materials together with your latest work into ONE FILE YOU SUBMIT AS THE CORE ASSESSMENT PROJECT.  A PowerPoint can be a separate file.  Double check the link above for the Core Assessment to see the grading rubric.

     

    There is no specific page requirement.  Make sure your unit is complete and viable for your purposes.  In your reflection later, write about what you should have done differently.

     

    PROJECT CHECKLIST

    Put together the work you have completed so far into the teaching/training unit.  Do you have the following?

     

    1. Topic of the teaching/training unit.

    2. Task analysis of the specific information you will/did teach/train in your 2-hour unit.

    3. Annotated bibliography about the content area you will teach.

    4.  Needs analysis of the students/trainees.  Describe the function and goals of the organization/institution and the specific group of people you will/did teach/train. Fit this assignment to your work situation.

    5.  Measurable learning objectives for your instructional/training unit.  Use those objectives to prepare the assessment measure (test) for the students/trainees.  Each test question needs to be linked to the objectives.

    6.  Test for trainees/students and results, which is an assessment measure with all questions directly related to the learning objectives.  Give the test, show the test and results, and interpret the results in your final core assessment report due week 6.

    6.  All learning activities designed to engage students/trainees, instructional materials, handouts, learning games, visual aids, PowerPoint (or some other example of technology), and other supporting materials.  Include the Participant’s Guide/Workbook containing all training handouts and materials for your unit.

     

    This is it, Gang!  Let's do it!

     

    WEEK 7 Presentation of Workshop

     

    Make arrangements to actually present the instructional unit or workshop at your place of employment, place of worship, or other appropriate context.  Upload at least a segment for people in this course to see and discuss in the Discussion Board.

     

    If you haven't already done so, write an assessment measure (test) based on your learning objectives.  Give the test to see what your students/trainees learned.  Show the results of the test and use them to interpret your effectiveness.  If you are just not adding this step, add the information to your reflection.

     

     

    WEEK 8 Self-Reflection

     

    Based on the feedback from your assessment instrument, trainee/student response, video self-viewing if possible, and your experience, reflect on your instructional effectiveness.

     

    Write a substantive reflective essay (500-750 words). An essay is written in narrative form, with an introduction, central idea (thesis), body, and conclusion. If you need guidance regarding how to write an essay, please review http://depts.gallaudet.edu/englishworks/writing/main/essay.htm or http://www.mdx.ac.uk/WWW/STUDY/Essays1.htm or http://www.monash.edu.au/lls/llonline/writing/general/essay/index.xml.

     

    If you have not already done so, upload a segment of your presentation, you can upload that segment as an attachment.

     

    If you created and administered the assessment measure since you submitted your project week 6, attach the test and the results of the test to your posting and use them to interpret your effectiveness.

     

    Some ideas you may want to answer in your reflective essay include the following: What have you learned about your teaching/training ability? How effective was your assessment measure in finding out what your students/trainees learned? How interesting and engaging were the learning activities you used? Were you creative enough to read all the students/trainees? What were your strengths and what do you still need to learn? What have you learned, and what do you need to learn? Reflect on your strengths and needs.

    How do you need to stretch yourself?

    .

     

     

    Weekly Self-Check Quiz

     

    Each week there is a self-check quiz over readings in the textbook. Completing the quiz is optional and there is no grade. You can take the quiz once. The results will be available at the end of the week after everyone has had a chance to complete the quiz. These questions are taken from the pool of questions used on the final exam.

     

     

     

    Content Area Exam

     

    Take one test over the instructional content you now or would like to teach/train.

     

    TAKE WEEK 2!  The Exam over the Course Content for CA 103, CA 104, Public Relations, or Kouzes and Posner.  Please complete this part early in the course.  Retake the test to raise your grade if you want.  It must be completed by week 4. 

     

    Be sure to take notes about problems with the test and how you will construct a more effective test over the material. You will need to post your analysis in the discussion area.

     

     

    Final Exam Due Friday of Week 8

     

    The final exam is in two parts:

     

    2.  TAKE WEEK 7 or 8.  Questions over the Beebe, Mottet, and Roach text. There are objective, short answer, and essay questions. You have ONE ACCESS and two hours to complete the exam. So, make sure you have whatever you need and reliable Internet service.

     

    NOT proctored. You can use any people or materials you want and may work on the exam collaboratively with other students in the course.

     

    OR YOU HAVE THE OPTION TO SELF PUBLISH YOUR UNIT

     

    Create a book or booklet you can sell or use to self-promote your skills. See the "Consulting" tab at the lower left.

     

    APPLICATION TO REPLACE FINAL EXAM

    If you want to apply to teach at Park University, you can complete the full application instead of taking this course's final exam.  This assignment does not count as extra credit if you also do the exam, but you'll need to complete the application to be considered for a teaching position at Park University.

     

    Below are the application procedures for becoming part-time faculty.  You may need to scroll down the page.

    Online faculty: http://captain.park.edu/portal/onlineforms/newfacultyrecruiting/teachonline.htm

    Kansas City area:  http://www.park.edu/human/kcarea.asp#Faculty

    Outside the Kansas City area: http://www.park.edu/human/outsidekcarea.asp#Faculty

     

    UPLOAD ALL APPLICATION MATERIALS IN THIS DROPBOX IN ADDITION TO ACTUALLY SUBMITTING ALL TO PARK UNIVERSITY.  You will need scanned or electronic copies of all the following. 

    1. Cover letter for the package.

    2. Undergraduate and graduate transcripts from all colleges and universities.  When you complete your MA in Communication and Leadership, you'll need to submit your final transcript.  Use electronically scanned copies at this point and have official transcripts sent directly to Park.

    3. Resume.

    4. Request for the courses you want to teach and a justification (see the Park U. catalog).

    5. 3 Letters of reference (please obtain at least one from a faculty member of our Communication and Leadership program).

    6. Student/trainee evaluations of your teaching/training.  You can use the ones completed for the unit your prepared for this course.

    7. Example teaching/training unit from the course.  And you may want to include syllabus, example test, and/or other instructional materials you developed elsewhere.

     

     

    Week 1  Exactly what is due this week?  Nothing, but go ahead and get started.

     

    Each professor has his or her specific requirements.  Here are likely expectations. 

    At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

    1.  Explore the course.

    2.  Begin reading the text chapters 1-3.

    3.  Figure out a topic to use for your 2-hour instructional unit.

    4.  Select a Learning Activity you like and post about it to the Discussion Board.  Also post to the Talk Turkey and any other threads of interest.

    5.  If you want to work ahead:  Next week you will submit a BIBLIOGRAPHY and TASK ANALYSIS of the content for your instructional unit, which will be part of the core assessment project for this course  (due by Sunday, Wk 2 in Assignment link dropbox). ONE CONTENT AREA EXAM DUE next week (your choice which one)

    Smile

     

     

     

    Week 2  Exactly what is due this week?  Everything from week one and two.

     

    Each professor has his or her specific requirements.  Here are likely expectations. 

    At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

    1.  Read text chapters 1-5.

    2. Select a Learning Activity you like and post about it to the Discussion Board.  Also post to the Talk Turkey and any other threads of interest where you feel like engaging with other students.

    3.  Submit a BIBLIOGRAPHY and TASK ANALYSIS of the content for your instructional unit, which will be part of the core assessment project for this course  (due by Sunday, Wk 2 in Assignment link dropbox)

    4. Pass ONE CONTENT AREA EXAM (your choice which one).  There's much flexibility here.

    Smile

    http://www.all4humor.com/images/files/Funny%20Horse%20Smile.jpg

     

     

    Week 3  Exactly what is due this week? 

    Each professor has his or her specific requirements.  Here are likely expectations. 

    At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

    1.  Engage effectively in Discussion and prepare the Needs Analysis of the individuals you will teach/train, including pretest or needs assessment measure and results (Wk 3 in Assignment link dropbox).

    2.  Read chapters 6 & 7.

    3.  Select a Learning Activity you like and post about it to the Discussion Board.  Also post to the Talk Turkey and any other threads of interest where you feel like engaging with other students.

    Smile

    http://www.pixages.com/frogsmile.jpg

     

     

     

    Week 4  Exactly what is due this week? 

     

    Each professor has his or her specific requirements.  Here are likely expectations. 

    At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

    1. Write behavioral objectives for your unit. 

    2. Create learning activities designed to engage students/trainees, instructional materials, handouts, learning games, visual aids, PowerPoint, and other supporting materials.  Include the Participant’s Guide/Workbook containing all training handouts and materials for your unit. 

    3. Prepare a test/assessment measure of objectives (Wk 4 in Assignment link dropbox).

    4. Read chapter 8 & 9.

    5.  Post to Discussion Board topics.

    Smile

    http://www.sillyanimals.com/funpages/all/happyfunpage/happyfun.jpg

     

     

     

    Week 5  Exactly what is due this week? 

     

    Each professor has his or her specific requirements.  Here are likely expectations. 

    At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

    1.  Read chapters 10 & 11.

    2.  Engage effectively in the Discussion Board.

    3.  Work on putting together the Core Assessment--2-hour training or instructional unit--due NEXT week.

    Smile

    http://enewsletter1.com/uploads/member/spca/laughingseal.jpg

     

     

    Week 6  Exactly what is due this week?

     

    Each professor has his or her specific requirements.  Here are likely expectations. 

    At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

    1.   Prepare and submit your Core Assessment.  Revise and put together everything you have for your training/instructional unit.

    Smile

    http://www.treehugger.com/bear-sitting-picnic-table.jpg

     

     

    Week 7  Exactly what is due this week? 

     

    Each professor has his or her specific requirements.  Here are likely expectations. 

    At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

    1. Read chapter 12.

    2.  Actually give the Training/Teaching Presentation to live audience. 

    3. Upload a segment of your Presentation for peers to see and discuss each other's work. 

    Smile

    AllPosters.Comhttp://1.bp.blogspot.com/_6dngziSFeMU/RjNMoL2LW-I/AAAAAAAAACI/9kZwfjJkS4U/s400/dog-smile.jpg

     

     

     

    Week 8  Exactly what is due this week?  Nothing, but go ahead and get started.

     

    Each professor has his or her specific requirements.  Here are likely expectations. 

    At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

    1. Pass the Final Exam or Self-Publish Unit or Apply to Teach at Park University--due by Friday.

    2.  Finish the Core Assessment Revision due by Friday, if needed.

    Smile

     

    http://www.tfc.edu/radio/adventureclub/dog_carseat.jpg

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    This page is for use only by enrolled students who have purchased the textbook. Copyright protected by textbook publishers. This course material is directly quoted from the textbooks and instructor's manual:

    Beebe, S. A., Mottet, T. P., and Roach, K. D. (2004). Training and development: Enhancing communication and leadership skills. Allyn & Bacon.

    Visuals in this course copyrighted by http://www.allposters.com/ or the source indicated.

    Other material is copyrighted JoanAitken.org 2005-2008. All rights reserved.